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  3. The Long(ish) Read: Walter Benjamin Unpacking his Library

The Long(ish) Read: Walter Benjamin Unpacking his Library

The Long(ish) Read: Walter Benjamin Unpacking his Library
The Long(ish) Read: Walter Benjamin Unpacking his Library, Walter Benjamin in Paris. Image © Gisèle Freund
Walter Benjamin in Paris. Image © Gisèle Freund

Welcome to The Long(ish) Read: a new AD feature which uncovers texts written by notable essayists which resonate with contemporary architecture, interior architecture, urbanism or landscape design. In this essay, written in 1931, Walter Benjamin narrates the process of unpacking his library. All in boxes, he takes the reader through elements of his book collection: the memories attached to them, the importance he placed on the act of 'collecting' and the process of accumulation, and how objects like books inhabit a space.

Walter Benjamin in brief

Born in Germany in 1892, Benjamin was known as a 'man of letters'. Having been educated in Switzerland he had a short career in the lead up to the Second World War, which saw him carve a niche as a literary critic. In the 1930s he turned to Marxism, partly due to the influence of Bertolt Brecht and partly due to the rise of extreme right-wing politics in Europe. He spent much of his professional life in Paris, where he wrote this essay. Benjamin died in 1940 having committed suicide at the French–Spanish border while attempting to escape the Nazis.

I am unpacking my library. Yes, I am. The books are not yet on the shelves, not yet touched by the mild boredom of order. I cannot march up and down their ranks to pass them in review before a friendly audience. You need not fear any of that. In­stead, I must ask you to join me in the disorder of crates that have been wrenched open, the air saturated with the dust of wood, the floor covered with torn paper, to join me among piles of volumes that are seeing daylight again after two years of darkness, so that you may be ready to share with me a bit of the mood—it is certainly not an elegiac mood but, rather, one of an­ticipation which these books arouse in a genuine collector. For such a man is speaking to you, and on closer scrutiny he proves to be speaking only about himself. Would it not be presumptuous of me if, in order to appear convincingly objective and down-to­earth, I enumerated for you the main sections or prize pieces of a library, if I presented you with their history or even their usefulness to a writer? I, for one, have in mind something less ob­scure, something more palpable than that; what I am really con­cerned with is giving you some insight into the relationship of a book collector to his possessions, into collecting rather than a collection. If I do this by elaborating on the various ways of ac­quiring books, this is something entirely arbitrary. This or any other procedure is merely a dam against the spring tide of mem­ories which surges toward any collector as he contemplates his possessions. Every passion borders on the chaotic, but the collec­tor's passion borders on the chaos of memories. More than that: the chance, the fate, that suffuse the past before my eyes are conspicuously present in the accustomed confusion of these books. For what else is this collection but a disorder to which habit has accommodated itself to such an extent that it can appear as order? You have all heard of people whom the loss of their books has turned into invalids, or of those who in order to ac­quire them became criminals. These are the very areas in which any order is a balancing act of extreme precariousness. "The only exact knowledge there is," said Anatole France, "is the knowl­edge of the date of publication and the format of books." And indeed, if there is a counterpart to the confusion of a library, it is the order of its􀂾 catalogue.

Read the full text (published by Yale University School of Art) here (PDF).

This essay was originally published in Literarische Welt in 1931 and was translated from German by Harry Zohn. It is featured in Illuminations (reprinted in English in 1999) and an extract of the text has been reproduced here under a fair use policy.

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About this author
James Taylor-Foster
Author
Cite: James Taylor-Foster. "The Long(ish) Read: Walter Benjamin Unpacking his Library" 24 Aug 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/771939/the-long-ish-read-walter-benjamin-unpacking-his-library/> ISSN 0719-8884
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