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  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. Chile
  5. DRAA
  6. 2014
  7. Charred Cabin / DRAA

Charred Cabin / DRAA

  • 01:00 - 23 September, 2014
Charred Cabin / DRAA
Charred Cabin / DRAA, Courtesy of Felipe Camus
Courtesy of Felipe Camus

Courtesy of Felipe Camus Courtesy of Felipe Camus Courtesy of Felipe Camus Courtesy of Felipe Camus + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Olmué, Chile
  • Area

    15.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Design Team

    Nicolas del Rio, Felipe Camus
  • Collaborators

    Gonzalo Pulgar, Magdalena Besomi, Freddy Alvarez
  • Constructor

    Hector, Felipe and Matias Molina, Tito Lizana, Sergio Ramirez Sr&Jr.
  • More Specs Less Specs
Courtesy of Felipe Camus
Courtesy of Felipe Camus

Text description provided by the architects. Commissioned as a mountain hideout, the Charred Cabin settles on a rather unusual location for Santiago inhabitants. Before the automobile era, a winding road linked the capital and the port across the Coastal Range. The area is full of historic places that recall the early years. Derelict Monuments, battle sites, gold mines remain nowadays abandoned.

Courtesy of Felipe Camus
Courtesy of Felipe Camus

Among the dominant slow-path countryside, an academic couple sharing the site with –peers- aim to profit from the melancholic atmosphere.

Courtesy of Felipe Camus
Courtesy of Felipe Camus

Minimum dwelling

To fit in a budget the activities required to fulfil within the cabin were explicitly simple: a place to eat, sleep and read for two, everything else is to be offset outside. In contrast with the open surrounding, the cabin is designed as a shelter with a measured connection with the exterior, which can be understood in two moments.

Drawing
Drawing

The entrance level (1) is depicted by a single window with a particular height, which shapes the activities of the lofty room, whereas cooking and bathing are pressed by the mezzanine. In the middle of the floorplan a steel ladder allows for an attic (2) which differences with extensive horizontal windows framing iconic mountains.

Courtesy of Felipe Camus
Courtesy of Felipe Camus

Construction

Originally meant as a self-built permanent tent, the cabin takes shape from SIP panels. The prefab modules are arranged and proportioned in order to stand out from the steep terrain on stilts. Swiftly assembled by a party of three, the easiness of construction was mandatory.

Courtesy of Felipe Camus
Courtesy of Felipe Camus

In order to avoid chemical products, the cladding pine planks were charred onsite following traditional instructions. A thin layer of sooth must prevent the cabin from decay and weather effortlessly. On the inside plywood panels cover electricity and water piping whilst providing a warm finishing.

Ground Floor Plan
Ground Floor Plan

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DRAA
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Cite: "Charred Cabin / DRAA" 23 Sep 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/548836/charred-cabin-nicolas-del-rio/> ISSN 0719-8884
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Courtesy of Felipe Camus

“烧焦的”小屋 / DRAA

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