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  1. ArchDaily
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  4. New Zealand
  5. Bonnifait + Giesen
  6. Cornege-Preston House / Bonnifait + Giesen

Cornege-Preston House / Bonnifait + Giesen

  • 00:00 - 8 February, 2013
Cornege-Preston House / Bonnifait + Giesen
© Paul  McCredie
© Paul McCredie
  • Architects

  • Location

    Martinborough, New Zealand
  • Main Contractor

    Borman Builders
  • Structural Engineer

    Spencer Holmes Engineers
  • Property Owners

    Anne Cornege, Ted Preston
  • Area

    200.0 m2
  • Photographs

© Paul  McCredie © Paul  McCredie © Paul  McCredie © Paul  McCredie + 31

© Paul  McCredie
© Paul McCredie

Text description provided by the architects. The building sits on a one-hectare site of undulating grassland in the town of Martinborough in the Wairarapa region of New Zealand. As part of the project 400 trees were planted in a grid that parallels the site’s boundaries while the 40m x 6m house is angled to follow the gentle undulations of the land. The “landscape grid” enters into the house in the form of decks/garage and courtyards which punctuate the volume. The long façade faces northwest for maximum exposure to winter afternoon sun and, consequently, best passive solar-energy gains.

© Paul  McCredie
© Paul McCredie

The key features are…

  • Concrete floor and wall construction, with a ‘heat-sink’ (Trombe) wall between the main living area and the guest rooms.
  • Water heating by solar Hot water panel on roof topped up by thermostat-controlled electricity.
  • Multi-zone underfloor heating (also by thermostat-controlled electricity).
  • Double-glazed windows and skylights for cross-room solar penetration and heat retention, with louvres and sliding doors for natural ventilation.
  • Wall and ceiling insulation of Wool.
  • Seperate Guest Wing with 2 ensuited double bedrooms.
  • Views to the surrounding landscape from every room.
  • Sustainably harvested macracarpa pine external cladding/decking and Italian poplar ceiling linings for visual warmth and acoustic absorption.
  • Two 25,000 litre tanks capturing rainwater (meaning that town supply water usage is about one third of the metered allowance).
  • A separately filtered (0.5 micron) and fast-heating water supply in the kitchen.

Plan
Plan

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Bonnifait + Giesen
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Cite: "Cornege-Preston House / Bonnifait + Giesen" 08 Feb 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/327836/cornege-preston-house-bonnifait-giesen/> ISSN 0719-8884