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  3. Update: Elbe Philharmonic Hall / Herzog and de Meuron

Update: Elbe Philharmonic Hall / Herzog and de Meuron

Update: Elbe Philharmonic Hall / Herzog and de Meuron
© Jose Campos
© Jose Campos

Slowly, but surely, Hamburg’s beautiful Elbe Philharmonic Hall is nearing completion (according to the Philharmonic’s construction website, the roof construction that seals the large concert hall has just been completed!).  We shared some photos of the concert hall’s innovative and iconic skin system when we visited Hamburg earlier this year, and recently, Jose Campos shared his latest set with us.

Check out Campos’ photos and learn more about the completed ceiling construction after the break.

For the complex roofing system, more than 100 individually designed prefabricated concrete slabs shape the tip of the volume.  Before the final completion of the hall roof, steel ropes were integrated into the statically advanced steel construction, and afterwards the gaps were filled with concrete. The dead weight of the steel and concrete construction is roughly 2,000 tons.

© Jose Campos
© Jose Campos

On the inside of the hall, a work platform elevated 14 meters above the future concert stage allows workers to finish the concrete work of the hall tip from the inside. 60 steel spring components, which acoustically isolate the hall from the rest of the building, have been installed beneath the hall tip, providing the only connection between the roof construction and the hall.   An additional 300+ steel springs have been applied at special contact points around the hall to prevent outside noise from entering.

© Jose Campos
© Jose Campos

Cite: Karen Cilento. "Update: Elbe Philharmonic Hall / Herzog and de Meuron" 18 Oct 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/177177/update-elbe-philharmonic-hall-herzog-and-de-meuron-2/> ISSN 0719-8884
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