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BSA Headquarters / Höweler + Yoon Architecture

Courtesy Höweler + Yoon Architecture
Courtesy Höweler + Yoon Architecture

The Boston Society of Architects plans to move from its current location on 52 Broad Street to a new space at Atlantic Wharf, as part of a major transformation of the 1867 institution. As part of an open design competition, the BSA selected Höweler + Yoon Architecture’s proposal entitled: Slipstream Public Exchange. Images of the proposal, a fly through video and an architects description after the break.

Boston Fusion / Bay Arch

Courtesy of Bay Arch
Courtesy of Bay Arch

The ambitious and successful award-winning architect, MAA Christian Bay-Jorgensen, from the architectural firm, Bay Arch, shared with us this unique and sustainable building at the harbour in Boston, Massachusetts. With affiliates in Ringkobing and Copenhagen and with creativity and energy in the blood, Boston Fusion will contain apartments and offices to create a new, green design in every sense with the help of eco-friendly materials from Icopal. This project also forms part of the plans for a new, green quarter called South Boston. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Lechmere Public Library / Alan Lu

Courtesy of Alan Lu
Courtesy of Alan Lu

At a time when the economic state of the United States is at a point where it is impacting the way students and current architects are going about designing certain building types, Alan Lu, who is currently the Presidential Fellow at MIT is deeply engrained within the realm of form, fabrication and the endless pursuit of luxury through space. His studies and research is demonstrated in his Lechmere Public Library design in Boston, Massachusetts where his hybrid form of institutional and private space combines to exist as a single entity. More images and description after the break.

Preservation Achievement Award Winners

© Peter Vanderwarker
© Peter Vanderwarker

The Boston Society of Architects shared with us their publication where members were given honorable recognition for receiving the Preservation Achievement Award by the Boston Preservation Alliance. While, undoubtedly, these iconic  buildings have been highlights to the city of Boston, they are now being acclaimed for being buildings of historic preservation while creating a resounding impact for society and beyond. Flip through the Boston Society of Architects’ images to view stunning work by architects after the break.

Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health / Peter Rose + Partners

© Matthew Snyder
© Matthew Snyder

Massachusetts-based Peter Rose + Partners had a simple strategy for designing the Kripalu Annex, part of the largest and most established yoga retreat in North America. Rose wanted his architecture to speak to the spiritual and natural essence of yoga by creating elegant material relationships and crisp aesthetics.

More images and more about the yoga center after the break.

Simmons Hall at MIT/ Steven Holl

© Andy Ryan - Steven Holl Architects
© Andy Ryan - Steven Holl Architects

When Massachusetts Institute of Technology commissioned Steven Holl in 1999 to design a new a dormitory for the school they had one goal in sight: that the spaces around and within the building would stir up interaction among students. While MIT focused on the building’s use and function, Holl aimed to create a memorable building. With MIT’s vision in mind along with Holl’s artistic architectural ideas, the ten-story undergraduate dormitory became a small city in itself with balancing opposing architectural elements, such as solids and voids and opaqueness and transparency. More on Simmons Hall after the break.

Pitch House / Carl Hampson & Eunike Design

Carl Hampson and Eunike Design recently designed the Pitch House for Belmont, Massachusetts.   The home is the reinterpretation for the ideals of early European modernism as it “evolves the universal machine for living concept into a site-specific contemporary dwelling shaped by the local forces of climate, culture, and sustainability.”  The main living spaces sit under a pivoting roof that responds to the changing seasons by providing the correct amount of sunlight and shade to the interior throughout the year.  The constantly changing roof “provides a centerpiece for year round outdoor activities.” An open ended site strategy responds “to the transformation of suburban ideals facilitated by the influx of information technology” while the home’s orientation, active and passive solar strategies, thermal mass, and earthen berms collectively reduce year round energy loads.

More images after the break.