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Momoyo Kaijima on the Origins of Atelier Bow-Wow

07:00 - 26 June, 2017
Momoyo Kaijima on the Origins of Atelier Bow-Wow, © GSAPP Conversations
© GSAPP Conversations

For the large majority of "household names" in the architectural sphere, their origins take on an almost mythical status – and this is certainly the case for Atelier Bow-Wow, one of Japan's most renowned internationally operating studios. In this discussion with Dean Amale Andraos (Columbia GSAPP), Momoyo Kaijima—who co-founded the practice with Yoshiharu Tsukamoto in 1992—discusses their particular relationship between research and practice, the difficulty and rewards of working in the Fukushima area following the 2011 tsunami and nuclear incident, and her personal interest in working across generations to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between buildings and their inhabitants.

Francine Houben on Washington D.C.'s Central Library, A Balancing Act Between Mies and Martin Luther King Jr.

10:30 - 23 June, 2017
© GSAPP Conversations
© GSAPP Conversations

In the tenth episode of GSAPP Conversations, Jorge Otero-Pailos (Director of the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia GSAPP) speaks with Francine Houben, founder and creative director of the Dutch practice Mecanoo. Recorded before the school's annual Paul S. Byard Memorial Lecture, their conversation centers on her practice's work to renovate and redevelop the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington D.C., Mies van der Rohe's last building and only library project.

In Conversation with 3 Rapidly Emerging Practices: L.E.FT, Point Supreme, and vPPR

10:30 - 21 June, 2017
Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations
Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations

In these three episodes of GSAPP Conversations, a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice, three globally-operating emerging practices are pressed and interviewed by students and staff from the New York-based school.

© GSAPP Conversations
© GSAPP Conversations

Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations Courtesy of L.E.FT Architects. Image © GSAPP Conversations Courtesy of VPPR. Image © GSAPP Conversations Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations +16

Small Projects, Wide Reach: Hilary Sample on the Benefits of Maintaining a Purposefully Small Office

11:30 - 17 May, 2017
MOS Architects, "Selfie Curtain" – 2016 Istanbul Design Biennial. Image © MOS Architects
MOS Architects, "Selfie Curtain" – 2016 Istanbul Design Biennial. Image © MOS Architects

In the seventh episode of GSAPP Conversations Amale Andraos speaks with Hilary Sample, an academic and co-founder of MOS Architects alongside her partner Michael Meredith. They discuss the lasting influence of ORDOS 100—a collection of villas built in Inner Mongolia by emerging and renowned practices—on the firm’s thinking, the role of representation, and how Sample's practice pursues an inclusive way of working and thinking – while maintaining a purposefully small office.

MOS Architects, "Selfie Curtain" – 2016 Istanbul Design Biennial. Image © MOS Architects MOS Architects, "An Unfinished Encyclopedia of Scale Figures without Architecture" – Nicholas Hawksmoor. Image © MOS Architects MOS Architects, "An Unfinished Encyclopedia of Scale Figures without Architecture" – Lina Bo Bardi. Image © MOS Architects MOS Architects, "Lot No. 6" – 2008. Proposal for Ordos 100, Inner Mongolia. Image © MOS Architects +11

Peter Cook is Concerned By Contemporary Drawing Culture, And Here's Why

04:00 - 4 May, 2017
Peter Cook is Concerned By Contemporary Drawing Culture, And Here's Why

In the sixth episode of GSAPP Conversations, Jarrett Ley (a current GSAPP student) speaks with Sir Peter Cook. They discuss architecture as a tool for shaping radical thought, the relationship of the current political climate in Britain, Europe, and the United States on architectural education and practice, and how the most interesting contemporary architectural projects appear to stem from "unknown architects in smaller countries."

11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

07:15 - 5 April, 2017
11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

It can sometimes feel as if the world is divided into two camps: those who do not listen to podcasts (probably because they don’t know what a podcast is) and those who listen to podcasts, love podcasts, and keep badgering their friends for recommendations so they can start listening to even more.

Unlike other media, it’s notoriously difficult to discover and share podcasts – even more so if you’re looking for a podcast on a niche subject like architecture, design or urbanism. To help you in your hour of need, Metropolis’ Vanessa Quirk (author of Guide to Podcasting) and ArchDaily’s James Taylor-Foster (whose silvery tones you may have heard on various architecture and design audio stories) have come together to compile this list of eleven podcasts you should subscribe to.

Factum Arte on Preservation, Recording and Recreation

04:00 - 28 March, 2017
Factum Arte on Preservation, Recording and Recreation

In this fifth episode of GSAPP Conversations, Jorge Otero-Pailos, Director of Columbia GSAPP’s Historic Preservation Program, speaks with Carlos Bayod Lucini and Adam Lowe (Factum Arte). Based between Madrid, London and Milan, the practice was founded by Lowe and has become internationally renowned for setting new standards in digital documentation and redefining the relationship between originality and authenticity. Here they discuss Factum Arte’s work, including the creation of the first high resolution digital record of the Tomb of Seti I in Luxor, Egypt, the importance of teaching students not only practical skills but also a conceptual understanding of how new technologies can be applied, and the importance of recording of artefacts during times of peace.

Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

09:30 - 24 February, 2017
Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

We are pleased to announce a new content partnership between ArchDaily and Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) in New York City.

GSAPP Conversations is a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice. Each episode pivots around discussions on current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests at Columbia, from both emerging and well-established practices. Usually hosted by the Dean of the GSAPP, Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the school’s influential faculty and alumni and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

The Other Architect

11:55 - 27 September, 2016
The Other Architect

The Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery at Columbia GSAPP presents The Other Architect, an exhibition of architects who expanded their role in society to shape the contemporary cultural agenda without the intervention of built form. On display are twenty-three case studies dating from the 1960s to today that illustrate how international and often multidisciplinary groups applied experimental attitudes and collaborative strategies to invent new tools and alternative methods outside of traditional design practice.

Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary

03:00 - 26 September, 2016
Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

This book is a collection of essays at the intersection of architecture and climate change. Neither a collective lament nor an inventory of architectural responses, the essays consider cultural values ascribed to climate and ask how climate reflects our conception of what architecture is and does.

Which materials and conceptual infrastructures render climate legible, knowable, and actionable, and what are their spatial implications? How do these interrelated questions offer new vantage points on the architectural ramifications of climate change at the interface of resiliency, sustainability, and eco-technology?

Columbia GSAPP Releases Online Catalogue of 20,000 Architectural Images to Students

12:35 - 14 September, 2016

The Visual Resources Collection (VRC) at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) has released the second phase of their online database, now containing 20,000 images of architectural plans, sections, diagrams and photographs. The Avery/GSAPP Architectural Plans & Sections Collection contains images related to GSAPP’s history of modern architecture curriculum, which focuses on the history of modern buildings, with an emphasis of 20th century Modernism.

Review: 'All Of This Belongs To You' - Civic Urbanism At London's Victoria & Albert Museum

05:00 - 1 April, 2015
Review: 'All Of This Belongs To You' - Civic Urbanism At London's Victoria & Albert Museum, A neon sign in the V&A’s grand entrance introduces the 'All of This Belongs to You' exhibition. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum
A neon sign in the V&A’s grand entrance introduces the 'All of This Belongs to You' exhibition. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), named after the Queen and Her Consort, has its foundations in the Great Exhibition of 1851 amidst the wealth, innovation and squalor of the Industrial Revolution. Britain was flooded by prosperity which allowed for the development of major new institutions to collect and exhibit objects of cultural significance or artistic value. The institute’s first director, Henry Cole, declared that it should be “a schoolroom for everyone,” and a democratic approach to its relationship with public life has remained the cornerstone of the V&A. Not only has it always been free of charge but it was also the first to open late hours (made possible by gas lighting), allowing a more comprehensive demographic of visitor.

Their latest exhibition, which opens today, seeks to realign the museum’s vast collection and palatial exhibition spaces in South Kensington with these founding concepts. The interventions of All of This Belongs to You attempt to push the V&A’s position as an extension of London’s civic and cultural built environment to the fore, testing the museum’s ability to act as a 21st century public institution. To do this in London, a city where the notion of public and private is increasingly blurred, has resulted in a sequence of compelling installations which are tied together through their relevance either in subject matter, technique, or topicality.

The Ethics of Dust: Trajan’s Column by Jorge Oteros-Pailos. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum ‘AgBags’ installed on the V&A’s stone façade as part of a work by Natalie Jermijenko. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum Spike studs by Kent Stainless Ltd. that are intended 
to discourage people from occupying various spaces in the city. Image © Peter Kelleher / Victoria & Albert Museum MacBook Air casing and components from a computer used by journalists to write editorial about the data leaked to The Guardian newspaper by Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor. Image © The Guardian/ Victoria & Albert Museum +9

Symposium: Interpretations / Critical Shifts

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
Symposium: Interpretations / Critical Shifts

Critical Shifts is a one-day, student-organized symposium dedicated to exploring the ongoing transformations of critical practice in architecture. The event brings together a diverse group of practitioners in order to investigate how their work (which often combines the activities and approaches of curation, editing, writing, design, teaching, and research) can begin to trace a nuanced map of the fieldʼs current critical terrain.

Mark Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia University's GSAPP

00:00 - 24 September, 2013
Mark Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia University's GSAPP, Mark Wigley with Kenneth Frampton, during the filming of The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”. Image Courtesy of http://vimeo.com/44405886
Mark Wigley with Kenneth Frampton, during the filming of The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”. Image Courtesy of http://vimeo.com/44405886

Mark Wigley announced Monday that he will be stepping down as dean of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) at the end of the academic year in 2014. 

A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America

00:00 - 20 September, 2013
A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America, Vishaan Chakrabarti. Image © Tina Gao, Columbia University GSAPP
Vishaan Chakrabarti. Image © Tina Gao, Columbia University GSAPP

Last monday, Columbia University's Avery Hall was buzzing. 

The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) hosted a highly attended event that welcomed respected academics and professionals from architecture and real estate to what the dean, Mark Wigley, warned might take the form a a celebrity roast. Vishaan Chakrabarti, a partner at SHoP Architects and director of the Center for Urban Real Estate at Columbia, was on deck to deliver an abridged, more "urban version" of a longer lecture on his new book, A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America. Proceeding the twenty minute lecture, an "A-list" panel of architects and historians -  that included Kenneth Frampton, Gwendolyn Wright, Bernard Tschumi, Laurie Hawkinson and Reinhold Martin - lined up to discuss Chakrabarti's work.

Studio-X NYC kicks off X-Cities 1: Making the Case for Smart

13:00 - 21 February, 2012

Tonight, Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) Studio-X NYC welcomes Fast Company’s Greg Lindsay and the Institute for the Future’s Anthony Townsend for the first of a new series of events focused on the “smart city”.

“Lindsay and Townsend are calling the series “X-Cities,” where X marks the spot at which information technology and mega-urbanization converge. In this first session, the pair will lay out their respective cases for the top-down, intelligent design of “smart cities” versus the bottom-up evolution of crowd-sourced “civic laboratories.” Is information technology a real tool for city-building? And, if so, what is its bright and/or scary future?”

This event will begin at 6:30PM at 180 Varick Street in New York. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required. Continue reading for more information.

Plastics in Architecture and Engineering at Columbia GSAPP

08:30 - 24 March, 2011

Columbia University GSAPP Presents their fourth conference on architecture, engineering and materials March 30 to April 1 at Wood Auditorium in Avery Hall. Permanent Change: Plastics in Architecture and Engineering explores the boundaries between architecture, engineering and materials science by mobilizing symposia, studios, exhibitions, books and films in an intensely focused investigation.

Columbia University GSAPP to Launch Studio-X Rio

20:42 - 13 March, 2011

Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) will launch Studio-X Rio this week with Dean Mark Wigley in attendance.  Studio-X Rio is GSAPP’s global network of advanced research laboratories for exploring the future of cities. With locations in Amman, Beijing, Moscow, Mumbai, New York, and now Rio de Janeiro, it is the first truly global network for real-time exchange of projects, people, and ideas between regional leadership cities in which the best minds from Columbia University can think together with the best minds in Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Asia.