Koloro Exhibition / Torafu Architects

© Akihiro Ito

The Koloro Exhibition by Torafu Architects features their complete range of ‘koloro-desk / koloro-stool’, including versions which they collaborated with Mina Perhonen. Shown in CLASKA Gallery and Shop “DO” in , the name ‘koloro’ is an Esperanto word, meaning color, many colors are used at the exhibition. They also display many colorful “airvase” throughout the space, including a new version where we collaborated with photographer Mikiya Takimoto, and a special version of“airvase”, which is enough large to cover your whole body, floating up and down with the help of a motor. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Natural History Museum Proposal / Kengo Kuma & Associates + Erik Møller Arkitekter + JAJA Architects

Courtesy of , Erik Møller Arkitekter, JAJA Architects

The proposal for the Natural History Museum of , designed by Kengo Kuma & Associates, Erik Møller Arkitekter, and JAJA Architects, focuses on creating a coherent and inseparable experience which mixes the experiences of the conventional museum and the classical garden into a series of remarkable spaces. Its location within the beautiful and historical setting of the city’s botanical garden creates a potential for a museum that is more authentic, more engaging and more open for everyone. More images and architects’ description after the break.

115 Norfolk / Grzywinski + Pons

© Floto + Warner/OTTO

Architects: Grzywinski + Pons
Location: New York, NY,
Design Team: Matthew Grzywinski, Amador Pons
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 27,000 sq ft
Photographs: Floto + Warner/OTTO

ASH House / I.R.A

Courtesy of I.R.A.

Architects: International Royal Architecture
Location: ,
Design Team: Akinori Kasegai , Daisuke Tsunakawa
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of I.R.A.

CB71 / La Proyectería

© Iván de la Luz

Architects: La Proyectería
Location: México City,
Project Leader: Alejandra Elizarrarás, Marisol Quevedo
Project Team: Miguel Guzmán
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Iván de la Luz

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: Reduce/Reuse/Recycle / German Pavilion

© Nico Saieh

Dealing with existing infrastructure has become the most important task facing German architects today. The greatest, most problematic challenge that lies ahead is the downsizing and conversion of postwar buildings, erected from 1950s to the 1970s, which are described as “too unsuitable, too slipshod, too inefficient to serve as housing in the future”. A complete reevaluation of not only of the structures themselves but also the social and historical implications of their unbuilt energy and resources is necessary in order to improve the urban fabric and achieve climatic goals.

In response, the German contribution to the 13th Venice Architecture BiennaleReduce/Reuse/Recycle, presents sixteen strategies that demonstrate the high degree of creative and architectural potential inherent in an affirmative approach to built architecture.

Continue after the break to learn more.

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: Possible Greenland / Denmark Pavilion

© Nico Saieh

The Danish Pavilion for the 2012 Venice Biennale will feature a collaboration between Greenlandic and Danish Architects called “Possible Greenland”. The exhibition will address the current development of the Arctic Region as Greenland undergoes a shift towards political independence and business development in the midst of dramatic climate changes. “Possible Greenland” attempts to look optimistically at the climate changes that are causing ice melts throughout Greenland. The shifting planes result in the exposure of vast mineral resources that can kickstart new industries and allow new urban cultures to emerge.

© Nico Saieh

It is interesting to see how global warming is making Greeland a new center, as water around can now be navigable. But we have been warned. While 38 billions worth of oil can be exploted in the area, a disaster can cost way higher (the Deepwater Horizon spill costed 60 billion). The exhibitions approaches every angle to think about the possible future of Greenland. Visitors are exposed to all this facts in a series of diagrams, projects and videos, including a traditional Greenland house with smoked fishes which give the exhibit a particular atmosphere.

More details about this exhibition can be found in our previous article. More photos after the break:

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: Walk in Architecture / Republic of Korea Pavilion

© Nico Saieh

The pavilion aspires to shed new light onto the status of Korean Architecture allowing the outside world to acquire a deeper and more in-depth understanding of what is currently relevant in the field of architecture in the country. “Walk in Architecture” expresses an idea and at the same time its paradox; it treats architecture as a place or a subject, like “Walk in Venice” or “Walk in a forest”. Walk is a collective action which combines associations: when you walk you think, you meditate, you observe, you dream, you wonder.

The exhibit is is supported by thin wooden supports, holding drawings, diagrams and video displays. Great examples from a country where pedestrians are taking more space than cars. This takes place at the Korean Pavilion at the Giardini, designed by Seok Chul Kim and Franco Mancuso in 1995.

Wuxi Grand Theatre / PES-Architects

© Jussi Tiainen

Architects: PES-Architects
Location: Wuxi, , China
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 78,000 sqm
Photographs: Jussi Tiainen, Pan Weijun, Kari Palsila, Martin Lukasczyk

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: Croatian Pavilion

‘Unmediated Democracy demands Unmediated Space’ – Courtesy of

This year’s Croatian pavilion at the 13th International Venice Architecture Exhibition presents different struggles currently taking place in various Croatian cities. The exhibition, Unmediated Democracy demands Unmediated Space, interprets the topic of common ground by directly asking the protagonists of those collective conflicts how they imagine a common future across and beyond market or state, private or public mediation. The “desires, constrains and potentials expressed in these sites of conflict” are a part of the wider wave of international protests that are demanding a real direct and unmediated democracy. The demands, gathered on the ground through a series of investigative interviews, form the basis for a possible planning strategy, while their resistance tactics become patterns that could shape a common territory.

The Croatian pavilion focuses on how these demands could allow us to imagine the configuration of possible unmediated spaces. It is organized around three sections: Context, Map and Devices.

Continue reading for more details.

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: Migrating Landscapes / Canada Pavilion

© Nico Saieh

We visited “Migrating Landscapes”, the installation at the pavilion for the 13th Venice Biennale. This exhibit has been organized and curated by Winnipeg- based 5468796 Architecture and Jae-Sung Chon, who joined together for this project to form the Migrating Landscapes Organizer (MLO). MLO invited, through a national competition, young Canadian architects and designers from a wide range of cultural and educational backgrounds to create scale models of ‘dwellings’ and accompanying videos that draw on cultural memories.

The installation uses pieces of unfinished wood in different sizes, a wooden landscape, where each of the participants “fit” their projects and a panel with a short video. A mix between the roughness of the wood, and the precision you can achieve with this material. My favorite? The Pickle House.

You can find more details about this exhibit in our previous article. More photos by ArchDaily after the break, and soon an interview with the curators!

Hamburg-Harburg Technical University Extension / gmp Architekten

© Heiner Leiska

Architects: gmp Architekten
Location: , Germany
Architect In Charge: Jan Stolte, Tilmann Jarmer
Design Team: Martina Klostermann, Inga Kläschen, Michèle Watenphul, Bastian Scholz, Jared Steinmann, Mark Botko, Alisa von Gerkan, Knut Maass
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Heiner Leiska

Diller Scofidio & Renfro’s ‘Granite Web’ Not Financially Viable for Aberdeen

Proposed Site – Rendering provided by the Diller Scofidio + Renfro submission boardsImages courtesy of City Garden Project

The life of a city-funded project is a tumultuous one. After winning a design competition early this year and receiving public support to move forward, Diller, Scofidio + Renfro’sGranite Web” design for the redevelopment of the nineteenth-century Terrace Gardens in Aberdeen, Scotland was recently rejected by the city council in a 22-20 vote.  The project promised to bring a revived pulse to the heart of the city centre with a public space that would bring a year-round civic garden onto the “unattractive” Denburn dual carriageway and railway line.

More after the break.

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

ArchDaily at the Venice Biennale 2012

The Corderie at the Arsenale © La Biennale di Venezia
The Corderie at the Arsenale © La Biennale di Venezia

Dear readers,

I’m writing this post from Venezia, , where ArchDaily has been for the past few days and will stay the whole week covering one of the most important architecture events: The 13th Biennale di Venezia.

This year the Architecture Biennale is directed by British architect David Chipperfield, who under the title Common Ground looks  at the meanings of the spaces made by buildings: the political, social, and public realms of which architecture is a part.

The title ‘Common Ground’ also has a strong connotation of the ground between buildings, the spaces of the city. I want projects in the Biennale to look seriously at the meanings of the spaces made by buildings: the political, social, and public realms of which architecture is a part. I do not want to lose the subject of architecture in a morass of sociological, psychological or artistic speculation, but to try to develop the understanding of the distinct contribution that architecture can make in defining the common ground of the city.

The list of participants in this version of the Biennale include world renowned architects like Peter Zumthor, Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel, OMA, Alejandro Aravena, Alvaro Siza, Eduardo Soto de Moura, Paulo Mendes da Rocha, and Norman Foster, among others on a  list of 200 offices.

CANCHA – Chilean Soilscapes, the Chile exhibit at the Arsenale. Co curated by Pilar Pinchart and Bernardo Valdes

During these days we’ve had the opportunity to visit and photograph several of the national pavilions and individual exhibits, and interview their curators. This coverage will start to be featured at ArchDaily in our dedicated page starting today. You can also follow us in real time in Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@archdaily), where we have already uploaded part of our coverage.

Please forward any comments, requests for meetings or  information related to the Biennale to editor@archdaily.com or using our contact form.

More photos after the break.

In The Middle Of The Village / STEINMETZDEMEYER Architectes Urbanistes

© C. Weber

Architects: STEINMETZDEMEYER Architectes Urbanistes
Location: , Luxembourg
Design Team: F. Legros, M. Vereecken, R. Fichant
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: C. Weber

Tube Pavilion / Megabudka

Courtesy of

Designed by Megabudka for Sretenka Design Week in , the key aim of the Tube Pavilion is to demonstrate how a space can be completely transformed with simple means. Created using one hundred lighting, or mirror tubes, at such a density of supports, the roof structure can be reduced to a minimum. If a mirror surface is used in combination with numerous tubes and a thin roof structure, a very interesting effect is created. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Diane Middlebrook Memorial Building / CCS Architecture

Courtesy of

Architects: CCS Architecture
Location: , USA
Project Area: 280 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of CCS Architecture

Facebook + Frank Gehry

/ via Bloomberg

As we shared earlier, the world’s 28-year old creative technological master will team with 83-year-old starachitect for Facebook’s newest addition to their Menlo Park campus.   The two, although worlds apart in terms of forte, find common ground in the never ending creative process, and the desire to continually push boundaries of the expected and the ordinary.  As we noted in our previous piece, the building will offer a equalized sense of status – no private cubicles or showy corner offices – and encourage a collaborative work environment, admix a warm splash of colors, textures and natural lighting.

Gone from the building will be Gehry’s flashy ways of manipulating sheets of metal, and the resulting superfluous sense of affluence often emitted from these grand structures.  Rather, Gehry’s work for Facebook will offer an ”equalizier”, a massive one story warehouse measuring 420,000 sqf, to house the company’s future 2,800 engineers with the underlying intention of fostering a comfortable environment to allow Facebook to keep getting better.

More about the newest headquarters after the break.