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Call for Research Proposals: The 2016 Steedman Fellowship in Architecture

15:30 - 9 June, 2016
Call for Research Proposals: The 2016 Steedman Fellowship in Architecture, Detail of a hand-drawn map by Arthur Gallion, who won the first Steedman Fellowship in 1926.
Detail of a hand-drawn map by Arthur Gallion, who won the first Steedman Fellowship in 1926.

In the natural world, adaptation is a competitive advantage. Yet the built environment is frequently characterized by rigid typologies and inflexible designs. How can buildings keep pace with changing cultures and contexts? In “Adaptation,” the 2016 James Harrison Steedman Fellowship in Architecture call for research proposals, early-career architects are challenged to explore how flexibility and adaptive response might be better incorporated into the design process. The winning research proposal will receive $50,000 to support up to a year of international travel and research.

reSITE 2016: 5th International Conference on a Hot Topic – “Cities in Migration”

12:00 - 9 June, 2016
reSITE 2016: 5th International Conference on a Hot Topic – “Cities in Migration”, reSITE Conference, Prague, Forum Karlin. Photo Dorota Velek
reSITE Conference, Prague, Forum Karlin. Photo Dorota Velek

On June 16-17, Prague will be hosting one of the leading architecture and urbanist events in Europe. Most of the 49 world renowned experts who will speak at reSITE 2016: Cities in Migration have experienced migration themselves. Coming from 20 countries, they will bring innovative solutions and successful strategies for European and Western cities to come to terms painlessly with the influx of new residents. Carl Weisbrod, Chairman of the City Planning Commission of NYC, Professor Saskia Sassen, sociologist at Columbia University, and Michael Kimmelman, the Architecture Critic for The New York Times will come from New York City. A huge number of speakers will come from Germany. Besides the famous landscape architect, Martin Rein-Cano from Topotek 1, Berlin, we will meet one of the city planner of Munich and the co-founders of the initiative “Refugees Welcome.”

Call for Entries: DANIEL GÖSSLER AWARD

15:20 - 8 June, 2016
Call for Entries: DANIEL GÖSSLER AWARD , Sonja Hnilica - Metaphern für die Stadt
Sonja Hnilica - Metaphern für die Stadt

The DANIEL GÖSSLER AWARD for an outstanding work of architectural theory will be conferred for the third time in 2016. All theoretical works that address relevant issues in current architecture and urban planning debates are eligible. The works should make a serious contribution to the current discourse and should refer to the socio-political context. Entries must have been published since 2011 and may not have previously been submitted for the DANIEL GÖSSLER AWARD. Works concerned primarily with architectural history are not eligible. Non-German entries must be submitted in German or English translation.

The competition is open to all architects and

Twin Creeks Linear Park Design Competition

13:30 - 8 June, 2016
Twin Creeks Linear Park Design Competition, Twin Creeks Linear Park Design Competition
Twin Creeks Linear Park Design Competition

The City of Kansas is sponsoring a design competition to bring in new ideas, energy, and visions to the development of Twin Creeks, a 15,000 acre predominantly rural area in the Northland of Kansas City that is projected to house up to 75,000 people over the next 20+ years.

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

06:00 - 8 June, 2016
Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

Spotlight: Charles Rennie Mackintosh

06:00 - 7 June, 2016
Spotlight: Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Glasgow School of Art. Image © Flickr user stevecadman licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
Glasgow School of Art. Image © Flickr user stevecadman licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

As one of the leading minds of art-nouveau in the UK, Charles Rennie Mackintosh (7 June 1868 – 10 December 1928) left a lasting impression in art and architecture. With a surprisingly brief architectural career, Mackintosh managed to stand out at the international level in art and design with his personal style known as the "Mackintosh Rose" motif. Born in Glasgow in 1868, Mackintosh is known for his play between hard angles and soft curves, heavy material and sculpted light. Though he was most well-known for the Mackintosh Building at the Glasgow School of Art, Charles Rennie Mackintosh left a legacy of architecture-as-art that transcends the Glasgow school and exemplifies trans-disciplinary architecture.

Architecture at Zero 2016

06:00 - 7 June, 2016
Architecture at Zero 2016

The Architecture at Zero 2016 competition challenge is to create a zero net energy (ZNE) student housing project on the San Francisco State University campus. The competition has two components. First, entrants will create an overall site plan to accommodate the 784 housing units, student services, dining center, childcare facility, and parking. Second, entrants will design one building, in detail, to indicate ZNE performance.

Financial Times Article Details How Biomimicry Can be Applied to Architecture

14:00 - 5 June, 2016
Financial Times Article Details How Biomimicry Can be Applied to Architecture, © Flickr CC User kudumomo
© Flickr CC User kudumomo

In a recent article published by the Financial Times, architect and public speaker Michael Pawlyn delves into how biomimicry can be applied to architecture in order to solve design problems and create a more sustainable future. Even in very early examples, biomimicry has been critical in the development of architecture, for example when Filippo Brunelleschi studied eggshells to create a thinner and lighter dome for his cathedral in Florence. In a modern example, biomimicry has been utilized—through the examination of termite mounds—to create cool environments without air conditioning in warm climates such as in Zimbabwe. 

Alejandro Aravena's Downloadable Housing Plans and the Real Meaning of "Open-Source Urbanism"

08:00 - 5 June, 2016
Alejandro Aravena's Downloadable Housing Plans and the Real Meaning of "Open-Source Urbanism", Courtesy of Elemental
Courtesy of Elemental

Earlier this year, we reported that 2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena announced that his practice, ELEMENTAL, released four of their social housing designs available to the public for open source use. A recent article published by Urbanisms in beta discusses what exactly “open source use” means to the architecture world, and how we may see these designs applied to projects in the future.

Announcing the SCI-Arc European Union 2016 Scholarship

11:00 - 4 June, 2016
Announcing the SCI-Arc European Union 2016 Scholarship

For European architects eager to expand their knowledge of contemporary architecture, SCI-Arc, the Southern California Institute of Architecture, has just announced the launch of a full tuition scholarship specifically for citizens of the European Union to study at the SCI-Arc campus in Los Angeles, California.

Open Call: Pioneer Women of Latin American Landscape Architecture

10:30 - 4 June, 2016
Open Call: Pioneer Women of Latin American Landscape Architecture, LALI - IAWA
LALI - IAWA

The Latin American Landscape Initiative (LALI) and the International Archive of Women in Architecture Center (IAWA) invites all its members to initiate a thorough search throughout our continent for the work of the pioneer women of Landscape Architecture.

Red Line Bus Rapid Transit Station Design Competition

10:15 - 4 June, 2016
Red Line Bus Rapid Transit Station Design Competition

IndyGo is currently in the process of designing the Red Line Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system. As part of the overall system design, IndyGo is facilitating a design ideas competition to foster creative design solutions for 28 rapid transit stations along Phase 1 of the Red Line BRT route with possible replication of these stations along the two future phases.

Making: Alternative designs for Factories

10:00 - 4 June, 2016
Making: Alternative designs for Factories, MAKING - Alternative design for Factories (www.nonarchitecture.eu)
MAKING - Alternative design for Factories (www.nonarchitecture.eu)

The aim of the “Making” competition is to develop a design proposal for the factory typology, intended as a place of creation and processing of goods of any kind. It is asked to the participants to create innovative and unconventional projects on this theme, questioning the very basis of the notion of factory. Recently many initiatives, such as fab labs and Makers fairs, have been proposing new interpretations of the functioning of factories, using on demand production and 3D printing to develop extremely successful models.

CityLab Article Details da Vinci's Technically Astounding Map of Imola

08:00 - 3 June, 2016
CityLab Article Details da Vinci's Technically Astounding Map of Imola, Public domain, via <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> Commons
Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

CityLab has recently published an article outlining Leonardo da Vinci's Town Plan of Imola, an "ichnographic" map from 1502, and the earliest of its kind in existence. Rather than utilizing elevations or oblique mapping methods like most other Renaissance mappers, da Vinci developed his own technique -- possibly using special hodometer and magnetic compass technologies that he invented -- to draw the city "as if viewed from an infinite number of viewpoints."

Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

06:00 - 2 June, 2016
Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa, Museo Castelvecchio. Image © Flickr user Leon licensed under CC BY 2.0
Museo Castelvecchio. Image © Flickr user Leon licensed under CC BY 2.0

One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

12:00 - 1 June, 2016
Spotlight: Toyo Ito, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Spotlight: Norman Foster

06:00 - 1 June, 2016
Spotlight: Norman Foster, Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young
Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935) - or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng - gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Building Trust International's African Design + Build workshop

12:19 - 31 May, 2016
Building Trust International's African Design + Build workshop

Building Trust are happy to announce that we will be working alongside We Yone Child Foundation to design and build a new hall space for a school that we have been working on for the last 2 years. Building Trust have a number of sustainable design and build projects around the World in 2016, ranging from schools and housing to wildlife conservation and healthcare.

We are offering a hands on participatory workshop where you will gain experience in sustainable building techniques and understand more about humanitarian design while building worthwhile projects that will have a huge benefit to the local community. You will gain an insight into a number of building techniques and architectural styles.