OMA Wins Skyscraper Competition in Stockholm

  • 19 Jun 2013
  • by
  • Architecture News
© bloomimages

has won the design competition for Tors Torn in , beating out four competing practices for the opportunity to build the third tallest twin skyscrapers in Sweden.

Existing urban guidelines call for a gateway to the new Hagastaden area of Stockholm, and OMA’s proposal accommodates a mixed-use program with a set of “rough-skinned” towers. The protrusions and inversions at different heights produce an alternating pattern of indoor living spaces and protruding outdoor spaces. OMA explains that their design “challenges the expected uniformity and homogenous façade treatment that is often assigned to tower structures. Instead, it extends the skin to expose the individuality of the separate living units in the two blocks – a true vertical, urban agglomeration.”

More on OMA’s winning proposal after the break…

Courtesy of OMA

Reinier de Graaf, who is leading the project with OMA Associate Alex de Jong, commented: “We are delighted to have won the competition and – together with Oscar Properties – to build the Tors Torn residential towers. The 100 meter high towers define the new neighborhood Hagastaden as an integral part of the growing city center of Stockholm. The informal appearance of the towers will express domesticity, perhaps even humanism.”

© Frans Parthesius

According to the press release, “In addition to private residential apartments, Tors Torn will also contain a diverse public program for the wider community of Hagastaden, an ongoing urban development project aiming to extend the downtown area of Stockholm. A bar and exhibition space will occupy the upper floors of one tower, with the ground floors of both towers accommodating a health club, library, children’s center and retail areas.”

Courtesy of OMA

The project is scheduled to break ground in 2015. In 2010 OMA won another competition for a mixed-use tower project in Stockholm—Station City.

Cite: AD Editorial Team. "OMA Wins Skyscraper Competition in Stockholm" 19 Jun 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 25 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=390972>
  • Patrick H

    The closeup shot is nice, and reminds me of Sadfie’s Habitat project. However, in the long views, the repeating pattern of the facade becomes obvious and seems to express exactly what they are claiming to undermine: “uniformity and homogenous façade treatment”. Also, I’m not sure how useful a balcony is, when you are in the howling winds 50 meters above the ground. These are nice ideas, but time will tell how they translate to the real world.

    • H. Niets.

      Here with the 3D views, the building seems to be a really nice project, even though they’ve used an exceptionally boring pattern.
      But in reality, after just a few year of use, the building will look like a grey massive block of concrete, like the unbearable bunker-looking projects of the seventies.

    • Pierre

      “challenges the expected uniformity and homogenous façade treatment that is often assigned to tower structures. Instead, it extends the skin to expose the individuality of the separate living units in the two blocks – a true vertical, urban agglomeration.”

      Safdie did it WAY better, even as a student!
      I can hear the mouse clicks in OMA’s projects:
      Copy (click), Copy (click), Copy (click), Copy (click)…

  • Scott Smith

    This is starting to get really boring guys.

  • Bruce

    Headline should have been “OMA wins with less-interesting version of Habitat 67.” Even the ribbed concrete is the same!

  • Felas

    Architecture in Stockholm is as grey as its cold and dark winter days.
    A breath of fresh air really.

  • fred

    Close up- interesting. Farther out-lack of scale may make the thing really problematic for the skyline. No big new idea, in contrast to much of OMA. Disappointing.

  • Darren Touchton

    Brutalism lives! although a bit more sexy.

  • Patriciq Dragneva

    no disrespect,Soviet’s superstructures have passed their time,now it’s time to get rid out of all those rough visions,that resemble the ideas of robotic workers campuses and start thinking about better solutions to the very same problem

  • Rick Zwerver

    was it a photoshop competition?

  • baoan

    Less (interesting) is more (valuable) for the jurors of the latest international competitions…unfortunalely tthe plagiarism in achitecture is a curent matter

  • boguslaw witkowski

    ‘Less (interesting) is more’ became the principle appreciated by the jury members in most of the latest international competitions and – plagiarism and lack of imagination among the winners…

  • boguslaw witkowski

    ‘Less (interesting) is more’ became the principle appreciated by the jury members in most of the latest international competitions and – plagiarism and lack of imagination among the winners…e

  • vahid

    its too BIG! seems ingels did it…