In Progress: Contemporary Jewish Museum by Daniel Libeskind

Sorry for the lack of posts this last few days, but before leaving to my computer died. Now i´m back home with a borrowed computer, and will be posting some buildings i found in SF.

This two rotated cubes are part of the adaptation of the 1907 Jessie Street Power Substation, adjacent to the Yerba Buena Park in San Francisco, into the new Jewish Contemporary Museum by Daniel Libeskind Studio and local architects WRNS Studio. The project houses 63,000 sq feet for exhibitions and programs in visual, performing and media arts, and includes 3,500 square feet of space for education.

The skin of the cubes is made of over 4 million luminous blue panels. According to Daniel Libeskind Studio “The blue colour of the steel is achieved through a procedure called interference-coating. Since there are not any dyes or pigments to decay, the colour will never fade or chalk”.

As you can see on the pictures, the building “appear to change colour depending on the time of day, the weather, and the viewer’s position, creating a dynamic, “living” surface…”. The union between the brick and the cubes is almost perfect.

It will open on June 8th 2008, more info at the Jewish Contemporary Museum website.

Photos were taken by me, except for the renders, roof top and interiors which are from Libeskind Studio.

Cite: Basulto, David. "In Progress: Contemporary Jewish Museum by Daniel Libeskind" 01 May 2008. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=115>

4 comments

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    Delighted to see that you are using a number of the photos I shot for the museum, however you are required to credit them. These images are copyright registered with the Library of Congress. The credit should read ©2008MarkDarley.Thank you.
    Sincerely, Mark Darley

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    How could this kind of architect just simply kept repeating themsevles? made me sick.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I wonder if this will generate as much controversy as his project on the ROM in Toronto. Many people are quite displeased with the results, especially the “cheap” quality of the “Crystal”‘s skin. Also, on a public building, shouldn’t the front door be more evident? A bench out front is not enough of a signifier to say ENTER HERE.
    Great photos though.