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Design Week Mexico

Broissin Arquitectos Reinterprets the Tree House in Glass

05:00 - 9 November, 2018
Broissin Arquitectos Reinterprets the Tree House in Glass, © Alexander D'La Roche
© Alexander D'La Roche

© Alexander D'La Roche © Alexander D'La Roche © Alexander D'La Roche © Alexander D'La Roche + 16

Design House, which is held annually within the framework of Design Week Mexico, is celebrating its tenth anniversary. In this year's edition, 24 local designers and architects transformed an abandoned home, each restoring a room or outdoor area. One of these interventions, by Broissin Architects, reconstructed the outdoor patio into a micro-forest with the small, glass house placed on a centenary ash tree.

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Materia Completes Concrete and Wood Pavilion for Design Week México 2017

14:30 - 12 October, 2017
Materia Completes Concrete and Wood Pavilion for Design Week México 2017, Cortesía de Design Week México
Cortesía de Design Week México

For the 9th edition of Design Week Mexico, emerging Mexican practice Materia has completed a architectural pavilion within Mexico City's largest public green space, Chapultepec Park. Commissioned by Design Week Mexico in collaboration with Museo Tamayo, the pavilion will serve as a major cultural attraction during the event from October 11th—15th, and beyond.

Design Week Mexico and Museo Tamayo Launch Museum of Immortality Pavilion

16:00 - 15 October, 2016
Design Week Mexico and Museo Tamayo Launch Museum of Immortality Pavilion, Courtesy of Design Week Mexico
Courtesy of Design Week Mexico

Now in its eighth edition, Design Week Mexico, in collaboration with Museo Tamayo, has unveiled the design for a major public architectural pavilion designed by leading German architects Nikolaus Hirsch and Michel Müller. Until Spring 2017, the installation will be a cultural attraction at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City’s largest public park.

Courtesy of Design Week Mexico Courtesy of Design Week Mexico Courtesy of Design Week Mexico Courtesy of Design Week Mexico + 18