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Cor Ten Steel: The Latest Architecture and News

AD Round-Up: 9 Projects That Make Creative Use Of Cor-Ten Steel

11:30 - 6 May, 2015
AD Round-Up: 9 Projects That Make Creative Use Of Cor-Ten Steel, Dovecote Studio / Haworth Tompkins. Image © Philip Vile
Dovecote Studio / Haworth Tompkins. Image © Philip Vile

One of the most interesting trends in architectural materials of recent years is the increase in use of weathering steel - more commonly referred to by its trademark name, Cor-Ten. Thought the material has been around for decades, first being used for architectural purposes in the Eero Saarinen-designed John Deere Headquarters in 1964, the material has seen a surge in popularity in the last decade or so, being used in everything from individual houses and tiny kiosks, to SHoP's design for the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, which used a staggering 12,000 weathering steel panels.

To celebrate this material we've rounded up nine of the most innovative and striking uses of weathering steel from recent years: Haworth Tompkins' tiny Dovecote Studio; Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios' offices and student housing at Broadcasting Place; the perforated facade of IGC Tremp by Oikosvia Arquitectura; the rusted ribbons of Ron Arad's Design Museum Holon; vertical striations on The Corten House by DMOA Architecten; Tony Hobba Architects' Third Wave Kiosk and its corrugated Cor-Ten walls; striking patterned facades in Santiago's Gabriela Mistral Cultural Center by Cristian Fernandez Arquitectos, Lateral Arquitectura & Diseño; weathered facades and louvers in Guillermo Hevia's Ferreteria O´Higgins; and finally the folding garage-style doors of Origin Architect's Refurbishment of the Offset Printing Factory.

Broadcasting Place / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios. Image © Sapa: Architectural Aluminium Solutions IGC Tremp / Oikosvia Arquitectura. Image Courtesy of Oikosvia Arquitectura Design Museum Holon / Ron Arad Architects. Image © Ron Arad Architects The Corten House / DMOA Architecten. Image © Luc Roymans Third Wave Kiosk / Tony Hobba Architects. Image © Rory Gardiner Gabriela Mistral Cultural Center / Cristian Fernandez Arquitectos, Lateral Arquitectura & Diseño. Image © Nico Saieh Ferreteria O´Higgins / GH+A | Guillermo Hevia. Image © Nico Saieh Refurbishment of the Offset Printing Factory / Origin Architect. Image © Xia Zhi + 11

The Power of Paint: Three Case Studies on Colour in Architecture

00:00 - 10 July, 2014

Based at the Architectural Association school of Architecture and linked to the Phd research program at UIAV, Saturated Space takes a comprehensive look at the “grammar” and history of colour in architecture, the perceptual and phenomenological principles of colour in relation to the human subject, and the socio-political aspects of colour as a culturally active agent. This article, written by architect and CLOG editor Jacob Reidel, originally appeared as “Powerful Colours” on Saturated Space‘s website, a forum for the sharing, exploration, and celebration of colour in Architecture.

Let’s admit it, architects are suspicious—if not a little scared—of colour. How else to explain the default contemporary architect’s preference for exposed finishes such as concrete, brick, COR-TEN steel, stone, and wood? Perhaps this is because an architect’s choice of applied colour may often seem one of the most subjective—and hence least defensible—decisions to be made over the course of a project.* Indeed, applied colour seldom performs from a technical standpoint, and it is the architect’s taste, pure and simple, which is often on the line whenever a specific colour is proposed to the client. Or perhaps architects’ mistrust of applied colour owes something to the profession’s well-known controlling tendencies and the fact that colour is one of the most mutable aspects of a building; better, we architects are instructed, to focus on “important” and “architectural” decisions such as form, space, materials, program, and organization. Indeed, it is far easier for a future owner to repaint a wall than it is to move it.