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Frida Escobedo, Designer of the Serpentine Pavilion, Among 2019 RIBA International Fellows

05:00 - 7 November, 2018
Frida Escobedo, Designer of the Serpentine Pavilion, Among 2019 RIBA International Fellows

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) unveiled the seven laureates of the 2019 International Fellowships, a "lifetime honor allows recipients to use the initials Int FRIBA after their name," recognizes the contributions that architects across the world outside of the UK have made in the field of architecture. Previously awarded to architects such as Jeanne Gang and Phillip Cox, the annual Fellowship emphasizes not only the impact of architects' work in their respective homelands but also their global influence.

A juror's committee, consisting of Ben Derbyshire, RIBA President; Lady Patty Hopkins, a 1994 RIBA Gold Medalist; Bob Shiel, a professor at the Bartlett School of Architecture; Wasfi Kani, a 2018 Honorary Fellow; and Pat Woodward RIBA, of Matthew Lloyd Architects, awarded the 2019 Fellows. The fellowships will be presented in London in February 2019.

Courtesy of RIBA Comms Courtesy of RIBA Comms Courtesy of RIBA Comms Courtesy of RIBA Comms Courtesy of RIBA Comms Courtesy of RIBA Comms Courtesy of RIBA Comms + 8

DISSING+WEITLING Wins Competition for Scenic Pedestrian Bridge in China

06:00 - 27 April, 2018
DISSING+WEITLING Wins Competition for Scenic Pedestrian Bridge in China, Courtesy of DISSING+WEITLING Architecture
Courtesy of DISSING+WEITLING Architecture

Nearly a year after opening its "Xiamen Bicycle Skyway," DISSING+WEITLING Architecture has won another major infrastructure project in the Chinese city. The winning design, "Xiamen Footpaths," is set to be a 21-kilometer network of paths and bridges creating a large-scale network connecting the surrounding nature and the budding metropolis of Xiamen.

Much like DISSING+WEITLING's "Bicycle Snake" did for bicycles in Copenhagen, the "Xiamen Footpaths" will improve the traveling conditions and city experience for pedestrians in the bustling city of Xiamen.

Why Current Sustainability Metrics Are Short-Changing Non-Western Cities

09:30 - 9 September, 2016
Why Current Sustainability Metrics Are Short-Changing Non-Western Cities, The High Line in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Amenities such as greenways are good for sustainability on a local level, but they have negative effects on a wider level that most cities fail to measure. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)
The High Line in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Amenities such as greenways are good for sustainability on a local level, but they have negative effects on a wider level that most cities fail to measure. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)

This article was originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "When It Comes to Sustainability, We're Ranking Our Cities Wrong."

A recent article published in Nature makes a bold claim: we're analyzing our cities completely wrong. Professors David Wachsmuth, Aldana Cohen, and Hillary Angelo argue that, for too long, we have defined sustainability too narrowly, only looking at environmental impact on a neighborhood or city scale rather than a regional or global scale. As a result, we have measured our cities in ways that are inherently biased towards wealthy cities, and completely ignored the negative impacts our so-called "sustainable," post-industrial cities have on the rest of the world.Metropolis editor Vanessa Quirk spoke with Professor Wachsmuth to learn more about the unintended knock-on effects of going "green," the importance of consumption-based carbon counting, and why policy-makers should be more attentive to the effects of "environmental gentrification."

Video: The Bicycle Snake / Dissing+Weitling

17:00 - 20 May, 2015

The Louisiana Channel recently paid a visit to one of the world's most bike-friendly cities to view what is dubbed "Copenhagen's new architectonic landmark," Dissing+Weitling Architecture's "The Bicycle Snake." "Strikingly slender" and boasting a simple orange track, the Bicycle Snake is a 230 meter bridge dedicated entirely to bikes. The steel bridge tries not to "be more that it actually is," unlike many other landmarks, connecting bicyclists to two main parts of the city by elevating them up to seven meters above the sea.

Guardian Invites Readers to Submit the Best City Ideas for World Cities Day

01:00 - 28 October, 2014
Guardian Invites Readers to Submit the Best City Ideas for World Cities Day, © NLÉ architects
© NLÉ architects

With the first ever World Cities Day taking place on Friday, the Guardian is partnering with UN Habitat for the Cities Day Challenge, a day-long competition where representatives of 36 cities around the world will present their best city ideas, with the winner being selected for an in-depth article in the Guardian. Judged by Ivan Harbour of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Toronto City Planner Jennifer Keesmaat; Anna Minton, Dan Hill, Usman Haque and Adam Greenfield, the Guardian will be live-tweeting the entire day.

They are also reaching out to readers to "share your photos, videos and stories of something brilliant that your city does better than any other," some of which they will feature throughout the day. You can follow this link to contribute - or read on after the break as we take the opportunity to round up some of the biggest city ideas that have passed through the pages of ArchDaily.

PLOT's Copenhagen Harbour Bath has been a hugely successful precedent in the urban swimming trend. Image © Casper Dalhoff +Pool, the biggest ever urbanist project on kickstarter, hopes to reclaim a piece of New York's Hudson River for Swimmers. Image © Family, PlayLab Acting as Christchurch's cathedral until the actual cathedral is rebuilt, Shigeru Ban's Cardboard structure has been hugely popular. Image © Bridgit Anderson One of the most successful ways of pushing a social housing agenda has been ELEMENTAL's 'Half Finished House' typology. Image Courtesy of ELEMENTAL + 12

How to Design Elevated Cycling Structures that Actually Work

00:00 - 10 September, 2014
How to Design Elevated Cycling Structures that Actually Work, London’s proposed SkyCycle. Image © Foster + Partners
London’s proposed SkyCycle. Image © Foster + Partners

There's no doubt about it - cycling in cities is a big deal these days. But, while cycle lanes and bike-sharing schemes are all well and good for our cities, the cycling revolution hasn't yet brought us many examples of beautifully designed infrastructure to gawp at. This article, originally printed on The Dirt as "Do Elevated Cycletracks Solve Problems or Just Create More?" discusses two seemingly similar examples of high profile cycling infrastructure, examining why one is a success and the other a non-starter.

This year, two designs – one proposed and one built – for elevated cycletracks, which create bicycle highways above street level, have gained considerable media attention. They highlight questions at the heart of urban design: Should cities blend or separate transportation options? How can cities best mitigate the hazards created when cars, bikes, mass transit, and pedestrians mix? How can cities create low-cost transportation networks in increasingly dense urban cores?

Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture

01:00 - 8 July, 2014
Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture, © DISSING+WEITLING Architecture
© DISSING+WEITLING Architecture

© DISSING+WEITLING Architecture © DISSING+WEITLING Architecture © DISSING+WEITLING Architecture © DISSING+WEITLING Architecture + 30

Ecco’s Hotel / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture

01:00 - 2 July, 2014
Ecco’s Hotel / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture, © Adam Mørk
© Adam Mørk

© Adam Mørk © Adam Mørk © Adam Mørk © Adam Mørk + 59