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Anders Ingvartsen

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ISOROPIA / Center for Information Technology and Architecture

02:00 - 13 October, 2018
ISOROPIA / Center for Information Technology and Architecture, © Anders Ingvartsen
© Anders Ingvartsen

© Anders Ingvartsen © Anders Ingvartsen © Anders Ingvartsen © Anders Ingvartsen + 22

  • Architects

    Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen, Martin Tamke, Yuliya Sinke Baranovskaya, Vasiliki Fragkia, Rune Noël Meedom Meldgaard Bjørnson-Langen, Sebastian Gatz
  • Location

    Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy
  • Category

  • Area

    79.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Hybrid Tower / CITA - The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts

05:00 - 12 March, 2017
Hybrid Tower / CITA - The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, © Anders Ingvartsen
© Anders Ingvartsen

© Anders Ingvartsen               © Anders Ingvartsen               © Anders Ingvartsen               © Anders Ingvartsen               + 31

Frontier Learning: the Future of Architectural Education / Stanislav Roudavski

00:00 - 27 November, 2012
The ‘Fallen Star’ installation, the final working prototype of the Architectural Association (AA) DLAB Visiting School. DLAB and The Emergent Technologies and Design Program at the AA in London are two examples of programs that are "productive in straying from current industry expectations and moving towards speculations on the future of practice." Photo courtesy of the AA
The ‘Fallen Star’ installation, the final working prototype of the Architectural Association (AA) DLAB Visiting School. DLAB and The Emergent Technologies and Design Program at the AA in London are two examples of programs that are "productive in straying from current industry expectations and moving towards speculations on the future of practice." Photo courtesy of the AA

Yesterday's article "Forget the Rankings, the Best US Architecture Schools Are..." argued that students should judge architecture schools for their strength in areas that are relevant to the profession today (not for their rankings). Today, we bring you an Editorial from Architecture Professor at the University of Melbourne, Stanislav Roudavski, who takes that argument one step further - suggesting that architecture students should look for education opportunities that embrace the architectural world of the future.

Those who look to the future understand architecture as a dynamic system of relationships. These relationships blur the distinctions between digital and physical, natural and artificial, simulated and observable in the wild. Such an interpretation calls for broader collaborations and a commitment to explorations outside established “comfort zones.” But the life outside disciplinary comforts can be harsh. With old certainties left behind and new potentials not yet discovered, one can feel overwhelmed by the richness and complexity of available information and practices. In the contemporary condition of constant and accelerating change, what should an architect know and be able to do? From where should this knowledge be acquired and updated, from whom and in which way?

Innovation (and the learning of the new, needed for innovation to occur) can be encouraged through various strategies. [...] Innovation can also be augmented outside existing professional territories via other types of critical, open-ended learning that is deliberately oriented towards uncertain futures. In striving to address unknown demands, such learning is necessarily speculative and risky. What strategies can be adopted to benefit from such risk-taking?

More on the future of Architectural Education, after the break...