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  1. ArchDaily
  2. Quezon City

Quezon City: The Latest Architecture and News

Viewpoint House / Jim Caumeron Design

© Bien Alvarez
© Bien Alvarez

© Bien Alvarez© Bien Alvarez© Bien Alvarez© Bien Alvarez+ 30

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  400
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Blanco, Catalano, Hafele, ABK Re-work, Boysen, +7

ET New Manila House / PXP Design Workshop Co

© Leslie Chua© Leslie Chua© Leslie Chua© Leslie Chua+ 32

Quezon City, Philippines
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: ET Supplier, EuroAsia, Rockefeller, ZWCAD

B Residence / Sim Ateliers

© Benson Go© Benson Go© Benson Go© Benson Go+ 23

Quezon City, Philippines
  • Architects: Sim Ateliers
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1200
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Crestron, Poliform, Casa Bella, Rockefeller Industries, Trimble

Arch360

Arch360 is short for Architecture in 360°. It aims to explore the various facets of the field through a series of symposium and discourses among professionals and undergraduates. This year, ASAPHIL focuses on the inclusion of the Filipino community members in creating a sustainable and progressive built environment.

AD Classics: Parish of the Holy Sacrifice / Leandro V. Locsin

Once dubbed a “flying saucer,” the Parish (Church) of the Holy Sacrifice is a Modernist expression which embodies the complex colonial history of the Philippines. Located on a university campus in Quezon City (formerly the capital of the nation, now a part of the Metro Manila National Capital Region), the domed concrete church was the product of Filipino architect Leandro Locsin, and of three other national artists who contributed to the building’s interior.[1] Locsin’s design, which combines elements of traditional Filipino architecture with postwar International aesthetics, is a potent symbol of a newly-independent nation following centuries of imperial control.

Courtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquezCourtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquezCourtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquezCourtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquez+ 7