the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
Navigate articles using your keyboard
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Churches
  4. United States
  5. Unknown
  6. 0
  7. AD Classics: St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church / Unknown

AD Classics: St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church / Unknown

AD Classics: St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church / Unknown
AD Classics: St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church / Unknown, © Weird Florida
© Weird Florida

© Simon Astor © Simon Astor © Simon Astor © Simon Astor + 13

  • Architects

  • Location

    North Miami Beach, Florida
  • Architect

    Unknown
  • References

    Way Marking, Weird Florida
  • Project Year

    0
  • Photographs

Text description provided by the architects. The unusual history of the St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church adds richness to the Floridian landscape as it gives people of all ages a breathtaking escape from the showy yet glamorous side of Miami. 

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

Initially built in the town of Sacramenia of Segovia in Spain during the period of 1133-1144, the monastery was named after the famous Cistercian monk Bernard de Clairvaux almost immediately after his canonization. For around 700 years, the stone walls housed hundreds of monks until the mid-1830's, when the Cloisters were seized, sold, and converted into a granary and stable.

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

In 1925, about a century later, a man by the name of William Randolph Hearst purchased the monastery, and began to deconstruct the structures stone by stone, binding them with hay to protect them as they were shipped in wooden crates to New York. In total, around 11,000 crates were sent off, each numbered to be easily identified in their new location.

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

Upon the time of shipment, hoof and mouth disease had been spreading in Segovia, so the U.S. Department of Agriculture took particular interest in the crates and their contents, as they feared possible contagion. 

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

The shipment was quarantined upon arrival in New York, the hay was burned as a precaution against the disease. However, the workers failed to place the stones with their proper numbered boxes before moving the stones into a warehouse, which would later confuse the reassembling process of the monastery in North Miami Beach.

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

When Hearst encountered financial difficulties, the stones remained in the warehouse in Brooklyn, New York, where they would stay for 26 years until purchased by Messrs. W. Edgemon and R. Moss after Hearst's death in 1952. 

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

The new owners of the stones had intentions to rebuild the church as a tourist attraction, and after 19 monts and around $1.5 million dollars, their dreams were realized and the monastery was complete. Due to the lack of a system, there remained unmatched stones, which were left in the back lot and later used to construct the Church's Parish Hall.

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

The ownership of the monastery was passed through several hands, until a multimillionare banker, philanthropist and benefactor purchased the cloisters and presented them to the local Southern Florida parish of St. Bernard de Clairvaux. As one of the oldest buildings in the Western hemisphere, it remains a beautiful destination for weddings, meditation, church services, and tours.

© Simon Astor
© Simon Astor

View the complete gallery

Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Cite: Megan Sveiven. "AD Classics: St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church / Unknown" 27 Dec 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/99074/ad-classics-st-bernard-de-clairvaux-church/> ISSN 0719-8884
Read comments
Read comments
© Weird Florida

AD 经典:圣伯纳德尔沃教会教堂