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  3. Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center Competition proposal / Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center Competition proposal / Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center Competition proposal / Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects
Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects
Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

Our latest proposal for the Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center International Competition proposal comes from Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects (in association with OZ-P and You-Yi Lu Architect). More images and architect’s description after the break.

Two images in our mind triggered this project. One is the view toward the ocean, associated with an adventurous mindset. The other is the view of a tropical city upon arriving, with flourish forest in close view. We believe these two images are symbolic of all the travelers to Taiwan in the span of its history; some of them stayed and some of them left again to explore other parts of the world.

Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects
Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

We transformed these two images/ symbols by two typologies/ armatures: the horizontal Wave and the vertical Tower. The Wave constitutes the Cruise Terminal, running along the entire site. Its typology is a double-spiral section which simultaneously opens toward city and ocean. The Tower is a 30-story skyscraper, containing the Port Service Center (mainly office spaces). It is a self-sustained building responding to its natural settings and advanced green building technologies.

Wave as open boundary The current Kaohsiung harbor area is central in location, but distant in citizens’ perception. Enclosed by a wall, the harbor was previously not accessible to the public. Replaced by a double-spiral typology (in plan and section), the boundary between city and ocean is blurred and the danger of developmental privatization is avoided. Through the waves, the city maintains constant and easy connection to the ocean.

Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects
Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

Wave as social landscape The objective of the Cruise Terminal is to create a landscape which will become a major public and social meeting point of Kaohsiung. Cruise Terminal is a place for people to come and go, hug and say goodbye. Relating to its program, we exploited the location –specific and climatic conditions of the site. It has to become a central meeting place for all cultures of Kaohsiung as well as for foreign visitors to meet here.

Wave as typology The form of the waves corresponds to its programs closely. Main function such as checking-in, boarding, waiting, and shopping can all take advantage of the wave form for functionality and theatrical effect. Especially the departure waiting lounge and arrival lobby, the double-wave section creates dramatic views which are analogical to the two montages in the beginning.

Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects
Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

Tower as soft landmark In contrast to traditional high-rise buildings, the Port Service Center is a unique skyscraper with a character which we call it “soft”. Not only does its geometry evoke different perceptions from different angles in the city, but it also interacts visually with other landmarks in Kaohsiung. We introduced the elegance and lightness to the tower, while its form- a soft K- can be interpreted by individual imagination. The softness and lightness help to bring the tower and the waves formally together.

Tower as vertical garden Extending from the horizontal botanical garden we introduced to the site, gardens and sky lounges are located in various levels in the K-tower. This vertical garden is a statement that incorporates state-of-the-art sustainable technologies and the tower’s natural setting. The energy generated by BIPV (Building-integrated photovoltaic) on the east and west facing facades can support the daily use of the Port Service Center and the Cruise Terminal.

Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects
Courtesy of Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects

Tower as viewing mechanism K-tower is a mechanism meant to see and to be seen. Its trapezoid plan inherently creates dialectical faces: a slim, elegant south façade and a curvy, ribbon-like north one. These two faces not only balance the transparency and sun-shading requirements in severe tropical summer, but also give the users framing ocean view and a wide open urban panorama.

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Cite: Sebastian Jordana. "Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center Competition proposal / Malone Chang + Yu-lin Chen Architects " 24 Dec 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/98283/kaohsiung-port-and-cruise-service-center-competition-proposal-malone-chang-yu-lin-chen-architects/> ISSN 0719-8884
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