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  7. Five Fields Play Structure / Matter Design + FR|SCH

Five Fields Play Structure / Matter Design + FR|SCH

  • 14:00 - 28 February, 2017
Five Fields Play Structure / Matter Design + FR|SCH
Five Fields Play Structure / Matter Design + FR|SCH, Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH

Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH + 40

  • Graphic Design

    Johanna Lobdell
  • Project Team

    Dar Adams, Courtney Apgar, Josh Apgar \ Michael Leviton \ Daniel Marshall, Chris McGuiness, Dan Roseman
  • Kid Consultants

    Liam Apgar, Mack Apgar, Bella Dubrovsky \ Sam Leviton, Ainsley Schanbacher, Judson Schanbacher
  • Size

    36’ long, 18’ tall and 4’ wide 66’ zipline
  • More Specs Less Specs
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH

Text description provided by the architects. This play structure is situated on the sloping landscape of a mid-century modern common land, where neighborhood kids enjoy a shared backyard. The Architects Collaborative designed and developed the Five Fields neighborhood in the early 1950s hoping to foster community by creating a piece of shared common land. In the ensuing 60+ years homeowners have come and gone but the community and its care and appreciation for the common land remain. TAC conceived the neighborhood as an experiment and the community, wishing to keep the experimental spirit alive, requested a structure that is both safe and exhilarating for the kids. They wanted something that would challenge the kids without any singularly functional elements.

Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Floor Plan 02
Floor Plan 02
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH

Designing a play structure intended for kids is a unique and challenging project. While there are irreducible standards that manage accessibility and function in the daily lives of adults, play is neither standard nor strictly functional. For this reason, these spaces are accessible to adults, but have been shrunk in order to slow the adults, liberating the kids to fly through the spaces.   

Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Sections
Sections
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH

The project is also dedicated to imagination, resisting literal and singular readings. Twenty-foot tall vertical elements contribute to the structure at one moment, but extend into the landscape—from function to whimsy. The colorful graphics suggest entries and key moments, without overtly labeling them. Pre-conceived architectural elements like doors and stairs do exist, but lead to nowhere. Thresholds are tucked under levitating volumes balanced on a single wall. Another principle of the design strategy provides multiple means of access to any location. These decisions produce escalating challenges for the kids; mitigating risk and ensuring the correct age-range have access to the more treacherous areas instead of withholding them entirely. Older kids climb over while younger crawl under. 

Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH

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Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
About this office
Cite: "Five Fields Play Structure / Matter Design + FR|SCH" 28 Feb 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/806182/five-fields-play-structure-matter-design-plus-fr-sch/> ISSN 0719-8884
Courtesy of Matter Design + FR|SCH

Five Fields 儿童游乐设施 / Matter Design + FR|SCH

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