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  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. Sri Lanka
  5. Zowa Architects
  6. 2015
  7. Kurundu House / Zowa Architects

Kurundu House / Zowa Architects

  • 22:00 - 18 October, 2016
Kurundu House / Zowa Architects
Kurundu House / Zowa Architects, © Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

© Eresh Weerasuriya © Eresh Weerasuriya © Eresh Weerasuriya © Eresh Weerasuriya + 20

  • Structural Engineer

    Signet consultants
  • Quantity Surveyor

    Chula Jeewakaratna
  • Contractor

    M.Kalyanaratna
  • More Specs Less Specs
© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

Text description provided by the architects. Tucked away in a remote mountain side off the Digana golf club road is Kurundu house ,a small 4 bedroom retreat for a busy financial consultant and his family. The site is a 132 perch bare plot except for a lonely Kohomba tree.

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

 There is no visible habitation in its immediate environs and one is immediately aware of the openness and loneliness. To add further drama it overlooks a branch of the Victoria reservoir which fills up during the rainy season, and in the far distance is the Hunnsagiriya mountains. 

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

The approach from the main road is a rough track winding through small village huts, vegetable gardens and large Mara trees and finally up a steep rocky lane that lands at the site.

Floor Plans
Floor Plans

This is when one is confronted for the first time with the breathtaking  view.

With a stage like this, at the outset we thought we should have a grand central verandah space that can  somehow capture the explosive openness  of this place while focusing on the distance views beyond, this would be the focal element from where one could access the rest of the spaces such as bed rooms and utility spaces.

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

The design was conceived as two staggered 2 storey rectangles with the verandah in the center. Further taking advantage of the slope this space was made split level, the top tier gives access to bed rooms on either side while the bottom tier accesses the a living room, kitchen and staff areas.

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

Apart from acting as the central circulatory space it is also informal sitting areas, the bottom tier is more open and next to a lawn and swimming pool with 180 degree views, this is where one would hang out most days, the top tier is  different in mood and feel, the filtered light through the cinnamon sticks adding to its ambiance.

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

By using the level difference to bury half the structure, we managed to presents a nonchalant single story façade to the road. The façade is clad in cinnamon sticks which conceals a passage that leads to bed rooms as well as the entrance verandah.

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

A narrow wedge shaped cutout in the cinnamon stick façade gives access to the double height verandah. There is no front door.

© Eresh Weerasuriya
© Eresh Weerasuriya

The lower verandah gives to a third living space which is a closable glazed living room which can be air conditioned. This is a place of refuge when the lower verandah is not usable during thunderstorms or during the hot days of the year.  The two solid blocks are treated simply, with lean to roofs draining to a common concrete slab that gathers rain water.The walls are unplastered ,painted brick work,and floors are cut cement in the rooms and rubble paved in the verandah’s. The spaces immediately in front and back of the building is grassed, to give foreground to the building but the rest of the land will be left to go wild. 

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Cite: "Kurundu House / Zowa Architects" 18 Oct 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/797378/kurundu-house-zowa-architects/> ISSN 0719-8884