the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
Navigate articles using your keyboard
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. United States
  5. O’Neill Rose Architects
  6. 2016
  7. Undermountain / O’Neill Rose Architects

Undermountain / O’Neill Rose Architects

  • 10:00 - 10 October, 2016
Undermountain / O’Neill Rose Architects
 Undermountain / O’Neill Rose Architects, © Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

© Michael Moran        © Michael Moran        © Michael Moran        © Michael Moran        + 22

© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

Text description provided by the architects. In order to heighten how it relates to its surroundings, the architects took a simple house to the extreme.  One end of this stretched, elongated house is anchored into the hill, while the other floats over marshy wetlands.  When it rains, the water literally runs under the house: next to the entry footbridge, a boulder strewn rain garden cascades underneath the house to the meadow beyond.

© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

Built for a nature loving couple who is retiring to the countryside, the house integrates ‘aging in place’ into its design.  The house is all on one level, sited so that the landscape rises and plunges on all four sides, in order to visually counteract the future loss of mobility.  In order to maximize the experience of outdoors, the screened porch can be enjoyed year-round, thanks to a large fieldstone fireplace and interchangeable screened and glass wall panels.  Taking human (and canine) centered design into account, windows on all sides frame key vistas; up towards the orchard, down to the lake, and across to the woods.  Two low windows are strategically placed so the dogs can look out as well.

© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran
Plan
Plan
© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

True to their aesthetic, O’Neill Rose Architects paired their sensitive approach to siting with clean, light filled interiors.  Streamlined references to the rural vernacular can be found in details like the turn buckle ceiling cables.  As with other projects, key furniture and lighting is designed and fabricated by the architects, including the blackened steel light fixtures and the blue cypress wood dining enclosure.

© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

Product Description. One of the principal materials in this project is cypress.  We like to re-interpret context in a way that highlights both the newness of our work and casts the original context in a new light. The agricultural buildings in the area, which are simple wood framed structures with field stone bases, really resonated with us. The stone bases anchor the buildings to the ground, and the lighter, wood structures engage the surrounding site.  We felt this gesture was really appropriate, and we could use it to really call attention to the building’s position within it’s site.  We chose to clad the building in vertical boards of cypress, stained with ebony, because it is a really beautiful wood, and the translucent stain showcased its beauty.

© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

We used it at the interior as well; cypress with the same ebony stain as the exterior creates the ‘house within the house’ that the kitchen service bar inhabits, while a special blue stained cypress enclosure plays double duty as a kitchen banquette enclosure, a spatial divider within the open plan.

© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

View the complete gallery

About this office
O’Neill Rose Architects
Office
Cite: " Undermountain / O’Neill Rose Architects" 10 Oct 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/796942/undermountain-oneill-rose-architects/> ISSN 0719-8884

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.