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  7. Self-build Shinto Shrine / Kikuma Watanabe

Self-build Shinto Shrine / Kikuma Watanabe

  • 19:00 - 13 July, 2016
Self-build Shinto Shrine / Kikuma Watanabe
Self-build Shinto Shrine  / Kikuma Watanabe, Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe

Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe + 19

  • Structural Engineer

    Syunya Takahashi + D Environmental Design System Laboratory
  • Construction

    Environmental Design of Architecture Lab. of Kochi University of Technology
  • Owner

    Inhabittants of Nakagonyu + Kochi University of Technology
  • Site area

    315.77 sqm
  • Total floor area

    4.05 sqm
  • More Specs Less Specs
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe

Text description provided by the architects. This is the self-built temporary Shinto shrine in a depopulated village in the mountainous area of kochi in Japan. For over 200 years the village used to have nine houses making up the kanamine shinto community, with a shrine set up in the upper part of the forest. However, the village started to lose its population, resulting in only one house and a neglected shrine that in 2015 was deeply injured by a heavy typhoon. In 2016 the worship structure faced a crisis and collapsed, so the inhabitants, together with the Kochi University of Technology located nearby, decided to construct a temporary shrine in the houses area.

Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe

Because the community was only inhabited by one person, the expenses of the construction were extremely limited. Furthermore, the road to the site was really narrow, obliging the team to carry the construction materials for one kilometer. This led the temporary shrine to be self-built, with little money and with limited materials. The team consisted of ten students plus architect and in five days they erected the worship space with steel pipes for the scaffolding, wooden lumbers, and wooden boards.

Section
Section
Plan
Plan

The triangular shape of the shrine symbolizes not only the sacred mountain but also the tunnel that leads to it. In the fall of 2016 a Shinto festival will be held by the inhabitants and members of Kochi University of Technology. The new construction aims to become the core of the community consisted of both inhabitants of the community and members of the university.

Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe
Courtesy of Kikuma Watanabe

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Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
About this office
Cite: "Self-build Shinto Shrine / Kikuma Watanabe" 13 Jul 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/791307/self-build-shinto-shrine-kikuma-watanabe/> ISSN 0719-8884

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