Warming Huts v.2015 Competition Winners

Shelter Winner: The Hole Idea / Weiss Architecture & Urbanism Limited (). Image Courtesy of Warming Huts

A “blind” jury has announced the 2015 winners of the international Warming Huts competition. Selected from 100 entries, two winning “shelter” designs and one “installation” design were awarded. Each winning proposal will be constructed in January alongside the longest naturally frozen skating trail in the world: the Red River Mutual Rivertrail in Winnipeg, . More about the winning designs, and four other highlighted proposals, after the break.

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights: “Failed Memorial and White Elephant”?

. Image © Aaron Cohen/CMHR-MCDP

In an article for The Walrus, Adele Weder examines Antoine Predock‘s (who was recently made a National Academy Academician) Canadian Museum for Human Rights: a “colossal, twelve-storey mountain of concrete and stone, 120,000 square feet of tempered glass, and 260,000 square feet of floor space.” Early advocates of the museum “felt that was ripe for such a statement piece,” just as Bilbao had been for the Guggenheim. Welder’s explorations are clear and concise, finding all sorts “of paradoxes swirling around the Museum for Human Rights.” Noting that “it’s definitely a kick-ass building, with its aggressive outer form, jagged paths inside, big black slabs of basalt, thick sheets of glass, and the huge metal girders that hold it all together,” Weder argues that it’s position as a “failed memorial and white elephant” may be it’s eventual undoing.

OS31 Designs Pop-Up Restaurant on a Frozen River

Courtesy of

UK architects OS31 have recently won a competition to design RAW:almond, “the first ever outdoor dining restaurant on a frozen body of water.” The temporary restaurant has set up for business in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada for the last two years, and for 2015 the organizers held an international open competition for the winning design. This year’s design establishes itself as an expressive frame that appears to float across the ice like a frozen jetty. Learn more about the winning proposal after the break.

AD Round Up: Canadian Architecture to Be Thankful For

The Crystal, extension to the Royal Ontario Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind. Image © Andrew Rowat

Today marks Canadian Thanksgiving, and to celebrate the occasion we’ve rounded up some of Canada’s best architecture. Our five selections represent five Canadian cities, each with a unique architectural sensibility. We begin in Toronto with the Royal Ontario Museum addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a striking intervention using prisms of glass and steel fused to a 102-year-old museum structure; next we go to Montréal for Habitat 67 by Moshe Safdie, an interlocking modular housing project designed for the World Exposition of 1967; to Calgary for Santiago Calatrava‘s understated Peace Bridge, a stunning glass-encased red lightning bolt spanning the city’s widest waterway; then to Winnipeg‘s Old Market Square Stage by emerging firm 5468796 Architecture, a chameleonic performance space wrapped by a mesh curtain of steel cubes; and finally to the outskirts of Vancouver for the Richmond Olympic Oval, a masterpiece of engineering and the centre of attention during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. Enjoy, eh.

Hygge House / Plain Projects + Pike Projects + Urbanink

© Jen Pauls

Architects: Plain Projects, Pike Projects, Urbanink
Location: Winnipeg, MB, Canada
Landscape Architect: Liz Wreford Taylor
Landscape Architectural Intern: Shawn Stankewich
Creative Director: Marcelle Lussier
Designer: Evan Marnoch
Architectural Intern: Colin Grover
Photographs: Jen Pauls, Evan Marnoch, Dan Harper, Liz Wreford Taylor

Centre Village / 5468796 Architecture + Cohlmeyer Architecture Limited

© James Brittain Photography

Architects: 5468796 Architecture, Cohlmeyer Architecture Limited
Location: Winnipeg, , Canada
Architects In Charge: 5468796 Architecture and
Project Manager: Hold Zone Inc.
Year: 2010
Photographs: James Brittain Photography, 5468796 Architecture

The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture

© James Brittain

Architects: 5468796 Architecture
Location: ,
Area: 784 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: James Brittain

The Avenue on Portage / 5468796 Architecture

© James Brittain

Architects: 5468796 Architecture
Location: , , Canada
Year: 2012
Photographs: James Brittain

‘Flying Saucer’ Condominium Proposal / 5468796 Architecture

©

Set for completion in 2014, ’s “Flying Saucer” condominium project 62M, designed by -based studio 5468796 Architecture, will occupy the corner of MacDonald Avenue and Waterfront Drive, close to the Exchange District. Named after its address, 62M will be a two-storey, circular building lifted up on 35-foot stilts. Its circular design is spatially efficient and will provide each unit with a view. As a whole, the 360° plan provides the widest possible perimeter for glass with the smallest amount of exterior envelope to construct. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Warming Huts v.2013 Competition Winners

Big City / Big City Atelier

Warming Huts, an open art and architecture competition on ice – has selected five huts that best “push the envelope of design, craft and art” for it’s 2013 edition. Selected from over 100 entries, these winning proposals will be constructed in January alongside the longest naturally frozen skating trail in the world: the Assiniboine Credit Union River Trail in , Canada.

Three of the huts were chosen from the open submission process, one from a separate University of Manitobacompetition, and one is being designed by award-winning firm Atelier Big City. Review them all after the break.

Michael Maltzan to Design Inuit Centre

Michael Maltzan, an award winning American architect and founder and principal of Michael Maltzan Architecture, Inc., was recently selected to design the Inuit Art and Learning Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. The selection committee was unanimous in choosing as the winning architect from 65 prospective teams from 15 countries. This recommendation subsequently received overwhelming approval from the WAG Board of Governors. The Centre houses one of the largest and most celebrated collection of contemporary Inuit art in the world; it’s also home to Studio Art and Learning programs. More information after the break.

Warming Huts v.2013 Proposal / Lateral Office

Courtesy of Lateral Office

Toronto-based practice Lateral Office has shared with us their proposal for the  v.2013 competition, entitled “Drift-Pass”. Inspired by the act of manipulating a snow fence, the plywood pavilion offers ice skaters shelter alongside the longest naturally frozen trail in the world in Winnipeg, . Continue reading for the architects’ description.

The Qualico Family Centre / Number TEN Architectural

© Brent Bellamy

Architects: Number TEN Architectural
Location: ,
Year: 2011
Area: 1,000 sqm
Engineering Consultants: Crosier Kilgour & Partners, MCW/AGE Engineers
Landscape Architecture: Scatliff+Miller+Murray
Photographs: Brent Bellamy

Bloc_10 / 5468796 Architecture

© James Brittain

Architects: 5468796 Architecture
Location: , Manitoba,
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: James Brittain, Lisa Stinner

Top Firms shortlisted to design Canadian Art Center

© Art Gallery

The Winnipeg Art Gallery has selected six architectural teams to be shortlisted for the design of its new Inuit Art and Learning Center (IALC). The Center will house the ’s celebrated collection of contemporary Inuit art, the largest of its kind in the world, and the Studio Art and Learning programs.

Selected from 64 international submissions, the six shortlisted teams are:

Movement Disorder Clinic / Cohlmeyer Architecture Limited

Courtesy of Cohlmeyer Architecture

Architects: Cohlmeyer Architecture Limited
Location: Winnipeg, ,
Project Year: 2006
Project Area: 6,000 sq ft
Photographs: Courtesy of Cohlmeyer Architecture

Rope Pavilion / Kevin Erickson

Courtesy of Kevin Erickson

Architects: Kevin Erickson
Location: , MB,
Architect In Charge: Kevin Erickson
Photographs: Courtesy of Kevin Erickson

Warming Huts v.2012 Proposal / Mjölk Architects

© Tomas Tesar

Mjölk Architects shared with us their winning entry, titled ‘Polar Hen’, to an international arts and architecture competition in , MB, Canada. Their design consists of a pump with a sprinkler connected to a compressor and a generator creating a very fearsome creature which lays ‘ice eggs’. The v.2012 was an open competition endorsed by the Manitoba Association of Architects. More images and brief architects’ description after the break.