Steven Holl Architects Tops Out Visual Arts Building for University of Iowa

Courtesy of

Update: Steven Holl Architects has announced the topping out of the ’s Visual Arts Building, a commission they won in a competition in 2010. When complete, the new building will work with their Art Building West, which they completed on the campus in 2006, to provide a dedicated arts space for students. Read on after the break for our coverage of the design reveal from 2013, and for construction photos and up to date renders of the project.

David Chipperfield Chosen to Expand New York’s Met Museum

The Met. Image Image via Wikipedia

The in New York has tapped British architect David Chipperfield to design its new Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art. The commission, a result of an international competition, aims to increase gallery space, double the size of the museum’s popular roof garden, and establish accessible on-site storage. “The new design will also enhance gallery configuration and visitor navigation throughout the Southwest Wing, and support a more open dialogue between the Museum and Central Park,” says the architects.

Whitetail Woods Regional Park Camper Cabins / HGA Architects and Engineers

© Paul Crosby

Architects: HGA Architects and Engineers
Location: , MN, USA
Area: 227.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Paul Crosby, Pete VondeLinde

Family Retreat / Salmela Architect

© Paul Crosby

Architects: Salmela Architect
Location: , WI 54844, USA
Principal Architect: David Salmela FAIA
Project Architect: David Getty
Area: 1280.0 ft2
Photographs: Paul Crosby

Frank Gehry to Redesign the “Gateway to Sunset Strip”

AD Classics: Walt Disney Concert Hall / Frank Gehry. Image © , LLP

An overlooked strip mall at the corner of Sunset and Crescent Heights boulevards will soon be replaced by a mixed-use, walkable community designed by Frank Gehry. Known to be the “gateway to the Sunset Strip,” the West site will be comprised of 249 apartments, restaurants, retail storefronts and a central plaza – all within “an environmentally sensitive building that complements and contributes to the historic architecture in the neighborhood.”

“Frank Gehry’s deep understanding of the property, its history and the context will elevate the project to the iconic and timeless status that it deserves,” said Townscape partner and project developer Tyler Siegel.

CALS Children’s Library / Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects

© Tim Hursley

Architects: Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects
Location: , AR, USA
Area: 38500.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Tim Hursley

MoMA PS1 YAP 2015 Runner-up: Roof Deck / Erin Besler

Courtyard during warm-up. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler

Despite Andrés Jaque of Office of Political Innovation emerging as the winner of the 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), his competitors put up quite a fight. One of this year’s five shortlisted proposals, Erin Besler’s Roof Deck breathes life into arguably the most overlooked aspect of architecture – the roof – by injecting it with an active public program and making it a vessel for summer celebration. 

Read on after the break for more on Besler’s proposal.

Reclaimed Modern / Julian Weber Architects

© Tucker English

Architects: Julian Weber Architects
Location: , WA, USA
Area: 292.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Tucker English

Preservationists Lose Battle to Save Orange County Government Center

© Matthew Carbone for Architect Magazine

Yesterday Orange County legislators decided to “take no action” against blocking the “destructive” rebuild of Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center. The plan, deemed by architecture critic to be “vandalism,” will remove one of the building’s three sections and replace it with a “big, soulless glass box.”

The 44-year-old brutalist landmark has been the center of a preservation debate for years; lawmakers argue that the building is “not easy to love” and expensive to maintain, while preservationists declare the building is an important piece of modern history and blame its state of disrepair on neglect. The council vetoed an offer last summer to allow a architect to purchase the property and transform it into artist studios. More on the decision, and more of Matthew Carbone’s images for Architect Magazine, after the break.

Renton House / Stettler Design

© Dale Lang

Architects: Stettler Design
Location: , WA, USA
Project Team: Daniel Stettler, Will Payne
Lot Area: 3,500 sq. ft.
Area: 3500.0 ft2
Year: 2011
Photographs: Dale Lang

Fate of Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center to be Decided Tomorrow

by Paul Rudolph © New York Times - Tony Cenicola

Tomorrow legislators are due to decided the fate of Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center. The midcentury icon, listed on the World Monuments Fund’s global watch list, has been the center of a prolonged debate challenging its right to be preserved. 

“The plan is to gut Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center, strip away much of its distinctive, corrugated concrete and glass exterior and demolish one of its three pavilions, replacing it with a big, soulless glass box,” says architecture critic . “[The legislators] can do the right thing Thursday. They can overturn the veto and reconsider demolition.” More on Kimmelman’s call to save the Rudolph landmark, here

The Cardinal / Modus Studio

© Timothy Hursley

Architects: Modus Studio
Location: 831 West Center Street, , AR 72701, USA
Principal Architect: Chris M. Baribeau, AIA
Area: 370605.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Timothy Hursley

Walter Netsch: The “Radical Mind” That Designed SOM’s Air Force Academy Chapel

© Hedrich Blessing

Having joined Skidmore, Owings & Merrill after World War Two at the age of 27, Walter Netsch was promoted to become a partner at the age of 31. Netsch entered the firm during what was arguably its defining era, when the reputation of Gordon Bunshaft and the image of a corporate-driven, teamwork-minded made one of the most recognizable practices in the US. He was also, at the age of just 34, responsible for one of ’s most recognizable projects of the decade, the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs and its striking geometric chapel.

To honor what would have been Netsch’s 95th birthday, SOM recently republished an interview between Netsch and architecture theorist and writer , which had originally been published in 2001 in SOM Journal 1. In the following extract from this interview, Netsch discusses the story of how he developed the design, and what it was like to participate in one of America’s most influential practices among a host of strong characters.

SteelHouse 1 and 2 / Zack | de Vito Architecture

© Bruce Damonte

Architects: Zack | de Vito Architecture
Location: , CA, USA
Architects In Charge: Jim Zack, Lise de Vito
Year: 2014
Photographs: Bruce Damonte, Paul Dyer

HWKN Unveils Design for “Pennovation Center” in Pennsylvania

Courtesy of Architects

New York-based firm HWKN have revealed the design for what is to become the University of Pennsylvania’s latest hub for entrepreneurs, researchers, and innovators. Dubbed “The Pennovation Centre,” the project is the first major development within the Pennovation Works, and will occupy a 58,000-square-foot footprint on the campus’ south.

A rejuvenation of the former DuPont laboratory, it is hoped that The Pennovation Centre will become an “iconic landmark” for pen, providing a “dynamic environment” for innovation in varied fields.

Johnson County Justice Annex / el dorado

© Mike Sinclair

Architects: el dorado
Location: , KS, USA
Architect In Charge: Dan Maginn, FAIA
Area: 48000.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Mike Sinclair

Brillhart House / Brillhart Architecture

Courtesy of

Architects: Brillhart Architecture
Location: River, , FL, USA
Area: 1500.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Brillhart Architecture

North America’s Radiant City: Le Corbusier’s Impact on New York

Co-op City. Image © Flickr CC user Runs With Scissors

Despite his status, Le Corbusier never had the opportunity to build in – in fact he only had one chance to build in the at all, completing Harvard’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts in Cambridge in 1963. But this doesn’t mean his influence isn’t visible all over the Big Apple. Originally published on 6sqft as “Towers in the Park: Le Corbusier’s Influence in NYC,” this article takes a look at three examples where Le Corbusier’s “Radiant City” ideals were transplanted to New York.

Even before taking his first trip to New York in 1935, Le Corbusier described the city as “utterly devoid of harmony.” After seeing it in person, his feelings didn’t soften. He wasn’t impressed by the tall towers, rather stating that they were the product of an inferiority complex, and he thought the city’s leaders were too timid to hire him. He wrote an opinion piece in the New York Times saying that “American skyscrapers have not attained the rank of architecture; rather, they are merely small objects such as statuettes or knick-knacks, magnified to titanic proportions.” He thought the city would benefit from buildings that “don’t try to outdo each other but are all identical.”