We’ve built you a better ArchDaily. Learn more and let us know what you think. Send us your feedback »

Four Practices Re-Envision Parking in Long Island Downtowns

Parks and Rides. Image © Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design and the Long Island Index
Parks and Rides. Image © Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design and the Long Island Index

Long Island’s downtowns have more than 4,000 acres of surface area dedicated to parking lots. That’s roughly 6.5 square miles of prime real estate, a phenomenon quite common in most American cities. When necessary, these lots are often exchanged for a standard “set of concrete shelves” that share little to no connection with their surroundings. This leads to the question, why must parking garages be so monofunctional and, well, ugly?

To help solve this nationwide issue, the Long Island Index challenged four leading architectural firms to envision a more innovative way to free up surface lot space in four Long Island communities. 

See what they came up with, after the break...

Architecture's First Full-Fledged Experiment in DeafSpace Design

The new residence hall on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., was designed by LTL Architects, in collaboration with Quinn Evans Architects and Sigal Construction. Image courtesy of Prakash Patel
The new residence hall on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., was designed by LTL Architects, in collaboration with Quinn Evans Architects and Sigal Construction. Image courtesy of Prakash Patel

This article, by Linda Hales, originally appeared on Metropolis Mag as "Clear Line of Sight"

The new dormitory at Gallaudet University exudes raw energy. Rough wood planks, exposed steel, polished concrete, and gleaming bamboo unite to provide architectural muscle. But the real power comes from a barely detectable dynamic. That energy doesn’t come from how the structure looks on its historic Washington D.C. campus, but how the building functions for the people inside. “It’s about how buildings structure and frame human interaction,” says David J. Lewis of LTL Architects. “The basic conditions of architecture were brought to the fore.”

The glass entry door slides open with a soft whoosh. Students ignore it as they crowd through the gap in a jumbled dance of elbows, hands, arms, and animated faces. Gallaudet is the preeminent liberal arts institution for youth who are deaf or hard of hearing, and most of its 1,821 students communicate with the expansive gestures and expressions of American Sign Language (ASL). That the students can make their way into the building without using their hands to open the door—thus halting the flow of the conversation—is cause for celebration. Here, at least, architecture has gotten out of their way.

Spotlight on Design: Intensities: Recent Work by Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis

Arthouse at the Jones Center by LTL Architects / © Michael Moran Studio
Arthouse at the Jones Center by LTL Architects / © Michael Moran Studio

Taking place September 24th at the National Building Museum, the Spotlight On Design: Intensities: Recent Work by Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis event highlights the firm’s ability in using the constraints of small budgets, awkward spaces, and strict zoning to generate innovative architecture. Marc Tsurumaki, AIA, one of the founding principals of the New York-based studio, shows how this “opportunistic architecture” results in compelling projects that include Austin’s Arthouse at the Jones Center and the Claremont University Consortium Administrative Campus Center. For more information, please visit here.

Arthouse at the Jones Center / LTL Architects

© Michael Moran Studio
© Michael Moran Studio

Located in the heart of downtown Austin, this project is a renovation and expansion of an existing contemporary art space. LTL was commissioned to design 21,000 sqf of new program within the building envelope, including an entry lounge, a video/projects room, a large open gallery, multipurpose room, two artists’ studios, additional art preparation areas, and an roof deck.

© Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio

Architect: Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis Architects (LTL Architects) Location: Austin, Texas, USA Project Area: 21,000 sqf Project Year: 2010 Photographs: Michael Moran

ORDOS 100 #30: LTL Architects

This villa is located in plot ORDOS project.

Architects: LTL Architects Location: Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China Project Team: Marc Tsurumaki, Paul Lewis, David J. Lewis, Kate Snider, Deric Mizokami, Laura Cheung Design year: 2008 Construction year: 2009-2010 Curator: Ai Weiwei, Beijing, China Client: Jiang Yuan Water Engineering Ltd, Inner Mongolia, China Constructed Area: 1,000 sqm aprox