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LTL Architects' Timber Intervention Wins Competition for Telluride Arts Center in Colorado

13:00 - 7 June, 2017
LTL Architects' Timber Intervention Wins Competition for Telluride Arts Center in Colorado, Courtesy of Telluride Arts
Courtesy of Telluride Arts

LTL Architects (Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis) has been selected as the winner of the Telluride Transfer Warehouse competition, beating out finalist entries from NADAAA and Gluckman Tang. The competition sought schemes for the adaptive reuse and transformation of the National Historic Landmark-listed warehouse in Telluride, Colorado into “an architectural and cultural landmark that provides contemporary, public art space that deepens and expands the cultural life of Telluride.”  

Courtesy of Telluride Arts Courtesy of Telluride Arts Courtesy of Telluride Arts Courtesy of Telluride Arts +26

NADAAA, Gluckman-Tang, LTL Selected as Finalists in Competition for Telluride Arts Center in Colorado

14:00 - 12 April, 2017
NADAAA, Gluckman-Tang, LTL Selected as Finalists in Competition for Telluride Arts Center in Colorado, via Telluride Arts
via Telluride Arts

Telluride Arts has announced the three finalist firms that will compete for the adaptive reuse and transformation of the historic Telluride Transfer Warehouse in the arts district of Telluride, Colorado. Selected from an initial list of 30 firms from across the country, Gluckman-Tang, LTL and NADAAA were chosen as finalists based on “their sensitivity to the Telluride Arts and Telluride Historic Landmark Districts, their experience with historic restoration, and their previous design experience with public spaces for the arts.”

The three firms will now develop conceptual designs for the building, with the vision of “[creating] an architectural and cultural landmark in the heart of Telluride that provides contemporary, public art space that deepens and expands the cultural life of Telluride.”  

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

08:30 - 18 August, 2016
Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing, Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects
Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section, the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects United States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects +15

Four Practices Re-Envision Parking in Long Island Downtowns

01:00 - 5 February, 2014
Parks and Rides. Image © Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design and the Long Island Index
Parks and Rides. Image © Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design and the Long Island Index

Long Island’s downtowns have more than 4,000 acres of surface area dedicated to parking lots. That’s roughly 6.5 square miles of prime real estate, a phenomenon quite common in most American cities. When necessary, these lots are often exchanged for a standard “set of concrete shelves” that share little to no connection with their surroundings. This leads to the question, why must parking garages be so monofunctional and, well, ugly?

To help solve this nationwide issue, the Long Island Index challenged four leading architectural firms to envision a more innovative way to free up surface lot space in four Long Island communities. 

See what they came up with, after the break...

Architecture's First Full-Fledged Experiment in DeafSpace Design

01:00 - 25 July, 2013
The new residence hall on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., was designed by LTL Architects, in collaboration with Quinn Evans Architects and Sigal Construction. Image courtesy of Prakash Patel
The new residence hall on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., was designed by LTL Architects, in collaboration with Quinn Evans Architects and Sigal Construction. Image courtesy of Prakash Patel

This article, by Linda Hales, originally appeared on Metropolis Mag as "Clear Line of Sight"

The new dormitory at Gallaudet University exudes raw energy. Rough wood planks, exposed steel, polished concrete, and gleaming bamboo unite to provide architectural muscle. But the real power comes from a barely detectable dynamic. That energy doesn’t come from how the structure looks on its historic Washington D.C. campus, but how the building functions for the people inside. “It’s about how buildings structure and frame human interaction,” says David J. Lewis of LTL Architects. “The basic conditions of architecture were brought to the fore.”

The glass entry door slides open with a soft whoosh. Students ignore it as they crowd through the gap in a jumbled dance of elbows, hands, arms, and animated faces. Gallaudet is the preeminent liberal arts institution for youth who are deaf or hard of hearing, and most of its 1,821 students communicate with the expansive gestures and expressions of American Sign Language (ASL). That the students can make their way into the building without using their hands to open the door—thus halting the flow of the conversation—is cause for celebration. Here, at least, architecture has gotten out of their way.

Claremont University Consortium Administrative Campus / LTL Architects

01:00 - 20 March, 2013
© Michael Moran
© Michael Moran
  • Architects

  • Location

    101 North Mills Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711, United States
  • Project Team

    Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, David Lewis; John Morrison, Project Manager; Hye-Young Chung, Matthew Clarke, Perla Dís Kristinsdóttir; Michael Tyre, Aaron Forrest, Deric Mizokami, Kevin Hayes and Tina Hunderup
  • Architect of record

    Grant / Takacs Architecture
  • Area

    42000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

© Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran +21

Department of Social and Cultural Analysis / LTL Architects

01:00 - 2 June, 2011
Department of Social and Cultural Analysis / LTL Architects, © Michael Moran Studio
© Michael Moran Studio

© Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio +12

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, NY, United States
  • Architect

    Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Architects (LTL Architects)
  • Project Team

    Paul Lewis (Principal), Marc Tsurumaki (Prinicipal), David J. Lewis (Principal), Clark Manning (Project Manager), Jason Dannenbring, Kristin Nakamura, Laura Cheung
  • Mechanical Engineer

    Laszlo Bodak Engineer
  • Structural Engineer

    Robert Silman Associates
  • Lighting Designer

    Renfro Design Group
  • Graphic Consultant

    Design 360
  • Audio Visual Consultant

    VideoSonic
  • Contractor

    R.P. Brennan
  • Area

    16000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2009
  • Photographs

Sullivan Family Student Center / LTL Architects

01:00 - 30 May, 2011
Sullivan Family Student Center / LTL Architects, © Michael Moran Studio
© Michael Moran Studio

© Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio +23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Laramie, WY, United States
  • Architect

    Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Architects (LTL Architects)
  • Project Team

    Paul Lewis (Principal), Marc Tsurumaki (Principal), David J. Lewis (Principal), Hye-Young Chung (Project Manager), Matthew Clarke, Clark Manning, Laura Cheung
  • Architect Of Record

    University of Wyoming Facilities Planning Office: Roger Baalman, Jennifer Jae Coast, Michael Ziemann
  • Structural Engineer

    Robert Silman Associates
  • Contractor

    Elk Ridge Builders & Design
  • Cad/Cam Consultant

    Tietz-Baccon Design and Fabrication
  • Area

    5200.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

Xing Restaurant / LTL Architects

01:00 - 24 May, 2011
Xing Restaurant / LTL Architects, © Michael Moran Studio
© Michael Moran Studio

© Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio © Michael Moran Studio +9

  • Architects

  • Location

    785 9th Ave, New York, NY 10019, United States
  • Architect

    Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis Architects (LTL Architects)
  • Project Team

    Paul Lewis (Principal), Marc Tsurumaki (Principal), David J. Lewis (Principal), Eric Samuels, Lucas Cascardo, Alex Terzich, Matthew Roman
  • Contractor

    Gateway Design Group
  • Area

    2000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2005
  • Photographs

ORDOS 100 #30: LTL Architects

14:00 - 26 March, 2009

This villa is located in plot ORDOS project.

Architects: LTL Architects Location: Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China Project Team: Marc Tsurumaki, Paul Lewis, David J. Lewis, Kate Snider, Deric Mizokami, Laura Cheung Design year: 2008 Construction year: 2009-2010 Curator: Ai Weiwei, Beijing, China Client: Jiang Yuan Water Engineering Ltd, Inner Mongolia, China Constructed Area: 1,000 sqm aprox