We’ve built you a better ArchDaily. Learn more and let us know what you think. Send us your feedback »

In Progress: Lotte World Tower / KPF

image by dbox branding & creative for KPF
image by dbox branding & creative for KPF

Construction of the Lotte World Tower in Seoul, South Korea designed by high-rise architectural firm KPF is well underway. Won via an international design competition, this new tower will rise up to a pinnacle height of 555 meters. Organized around a mixed-use program including retail, office, hotel and an observation deck at the peak, the tower pulls inspiration from historical Korean arts of ceramics, porcelain, and calligraphy. More details after the break.

image by dbox branding & creative for KPF © KPF image by dbox branding & creative for KPF © KPF

Arizona State University School of Earth and Space Exploration (ISTB4) / Ehrlich Architects

© Ehrlich Architects
© Ehrlich Architects

Arizona State University’s new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 4 (ISTB 4) was designed to be a progressive home for ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE) and some departments from the Fulton Schools of Engineering (FSE). At 294,000 sq.-ft., this seven-story “smart” structure will be the largest research facility in the history of the university. In addition to cutting-edge laboratories and research offices, ISTB 4 will house extensive public outreach and K-12 education spaces designed to engage the Greater Phoenix community in earth and space exploration. Ehrlich Architects’ new Arizona State University School of Earth and Space Exploration is a clearly organized laboratory building that will enhance the research, science and educational programs housed within.

Video: Global Conservation Center / FXFOWLE

This LEED Gold building is now the headquarters for the Wildlife Conservation Society. Designed by FXFOWLE, the Global Conservation Center sits in the middle of the Bronx Zoo. The building harmonizes so well with the site that the wild animals hardly give notice to its presence; they treat it much like they treat a natural rock outcropping in the landscape. This makes for interesting employee lunches where they spend their time observing wild turkeys, swooping Inca terns and many other creatures. The design capitalizes on this wonderful opportunity by drawing staff outside with generous terraces and a patio the size of the staff dinning room. From more information check out the video and read Laura Raskin’s article at Architectural Record’s website.

Mashouf Performing Arts Center at San Francisco State University / Michael Maltzan Architecture

Courtesy of Michael Maltzan Architecture
Courtesy of Michael Maltzan Architecture

The recently unveiled renderings for the Mashouf Performing Arts Center at San Francisco State University (SFSU), feature not just one new building but five performance spaces linked through a series of transparent hallways and classrooms. Michael Maltzan Architecture, the designers behind the new Arts Center garnered the commission ahead of six shortlisted firms including Diller Scofidio + Renfro. “The building is almost like a city. It is meant to act like a small campus with those spaces and connective elements,” said Maltzan. “There’s one continuous horizontal layer, which connects across the entire project and many different disciplines. With informal as well as formal spots, in the choreography of that mix, you create the culture of the college.” The architects were inspired by the triangular site and its slanted lines, which they chose to repeat throughout the overall design and details of the buildings. This repetition can be seen in a series of sloping balconies within the primary performance space and the triangular shaped courtyards that are exterior connections between the buildings. More details about this newly unveiled design and renderings following the break.

Courtesy of Michael Maltzan Architecture Courtesy of Michael Maltzan Architecture Courtesy of Michael Maltzan Architecture Courtesy of Michael Maltzan Architecture

Chicago Children’s Museum / Krueck & Sexton Architects

exterior plaza
exterior plaza

Chicago Children’s Museum’s mission is to create a community where play and learning connect. The museum’s primary audiences are children up through fifth grade including their families, along with school and community groups that support and influence children’s growth and development. In its current location at Navy Pier, the Museum lacks meaningful connections to the outdoors and is challenged with the heavyly commercial environment of what has become Illinois’ most popular tourist attraction. Follow the break for more drawings of this projected Leed Gold project. Architects: Krueck & Sexton Architects Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA MEP Engineers: Environmental Systems Design Environmetal Design Consultants: Atelier Ten Structural Engineers: Thornton Tomasetti Renderings: Courtesy of Krueck & Sexton Architects

The Diana Center at Barnard College Achieves Leed Gold Rating

© Albert Vecerka/Esto
© Albert Vecerka/Esto

The Diana Center at Barnard College has achieved a LEED Gold rating, the highest level of certification by the U.S. Green Building Council. A 98,000-square-foot multi-use building designed by Weiss/Manfredi, the Diana Center serves as a campus center for the Barnard community and as a cultural destination for visitors from near and far. The structure won the 2011 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Honor Award for Architecture and the AIA Best in New York State Award. It was also recently named Building of the Year in the Educational category, by ArchDaily. Full press release after the break.

One World Trade Center gets to 260 feet

One World Trade Center has reached a construction milestone by rising 260 ft above street level. Upon its completion in 2013, it will become the tallest office building in the United States reaching 104 stories. Currently standing at the 26th floor level, the 1,776-ft-tall office building is being designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (NY office) and developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and is scheduled to reach a height of 50 stories by the end of 2010. To date, more than 67,000 cubic yards of concrete have been poured for the tower, both above and below ground exceeding the amount of concrete used to build the entire Empire State Building. One World Trade Center will incorporate design elements based on LEED Gold criteria with energy efficiency running 20% higher than city codes presently require. Seen at GreenSource.