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Vanke One City / Kokaistudios

  • Architects: Kokaistudios
  • Location: Yantian, Shenzhen, China
  • Project Team: Andrea Destefanis, Filippo Gabbiani, Pietro Peyron, Qin Zhantao, Yu Liding, Li Wei
  • Area: 2300.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Lu Feng Photography, New & Old Studio

Courtesy of Kokaistudios Courtesy of Kokaistudios Courtesy of Kokaistudios Courtesy of Kokaistudios

2013 EBie Finalists Announced

Known as the 'Oscars of Sustainable Existing Buildings', the finalists for the annual EBie Awards were recently announced by the Urban Green Council which aimed to celebrate sustainability improvements in Existing Buildings (therefore the EBies) and the individuals who made them happen. Recognizing “unsung heroes” who have made great strides in improving environmental performance, research shows that changes to existing buildings will have the greatest environmental impact, despite new buildings often getting the spotlight. More images and information on the finalists and their projects after the break.

Harpa Concert Hall wins the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award 2013

Harpa, the Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre in Iceland, is the winner of the 2013 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award the European Commission and the Mies van der Rohe Foundation announced today. Designed by Henning Larsen Architects, Batteríið Architects and Studio Olafur Eliasson the building has helped to transform and revitalise Reykjavik harbour and brought the city and harbour district closer together. 

The 'Emerging Architect Special Mention' award goes to María Langarita and Víctor Navarro for the Nave de Música Matadero (Red Bull Music Academy) in Madrid, Spain. The award ceremony will take place on 7 June at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona, coinciding with the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the prize.

More information after the break.

Ski Restaurant Raduša / 3LHD

  • Architects: 3LHD
  • Location: Gornji Vakuf, Gornji Vakuf-Uskoplje, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Project Team: Saša Begović, Marko Dabrović, Tatjana Grozdanić Begović, Silvije Novak, Vibor Granić, Ines Vlahović
  • Area: 420.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Courtesy of 3LHD

Courtesy of 3LHD Courtesy of 3LHD Courtesy of 3LHD Courtesy of 3LHD

Vila Stoliv / Enforma Studio

Courtesy of Enforma Studio
Courtesy of Enforma Studio
  • Architects: Enforma Studio
  • Location: Stoliv, Montenegro
  • Author: Marh Nikola Novaković
  • Associate: Marijela Pajić
  • Area: 424.5 sqm
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Enforma Studio

Courtesy of Enforma Studio Courtesy of Enforma Studio Courtesy of Enforma Studio Courtesy of Enforma Studio

An Exclusive Interview with Ian Harris, Director of 'Archiculture'

© Arbuckle Industries
© Arbuckle Industries

Architects and students worldwide are highly anticipating the Monday premiere of Archiculture - a documentary that offers a unique glimpse into the world of studio-based, design education through the eyes of five architecture students finishing their final design projects at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute. The film, directed and produced by two architect-turned-filmmakers Ian Harris and David Krantz of Arbuckle Industries, features exclusive interviews with leading professionals, historians and educators to help create a crucial dialog around the key issues faced by this unique teaching methodology.

Eager to learn more, we sat down with director Ian Harris for an exclusive interview. Read the interview and share your thoughts after the break.

Kronverk Cinema / Robert Majkut Design

© Andrey Cordelianu
© Andrey Cordelianu
  • Architects: Robert Majkut Design
  • Location: Warszawa, Poland
  • Area: 1045.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2009
  • Photographs: Andrey Cordelianu

© Andrey Cordelianu © Andrey Cordelianu © Andrey Cordelianu © Andrey Cordelianu

'Soft Modernism – The Nature of Circumstance' Peter Bohlin Lecture

Taking place at NewSchool of Architecture and Design this Wednesday, May 1st, at 6:00pm, architect Peter Bohlin, FAIA, will be speaking on the topic of 'Soft Modernism – The Nature of Circumstance'. Using examples of the firm’s work from early to current projects, Peter will discuss the rich and powerful buildings of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson that resulted from The Nature of Circumstance. These range from the nature of places, both man-made and natural, to the varied nature of humans and their particular activities and to the nature of the means with which we build. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, please visit here.

Famen Temple Zen Meditation Center Winning Proposal / OAC

Following OAC’s win in the international design competition and completion of the master plan for the Famen Temple Zen Meditation Center in 2012, the architects recently completed the schematic designs for the buildings, landscape, and experiential features and art installations for meditation in the first phase of the project called the ‘Eightfold Path Forest’. As part of the new cultural master plan development on the site of the renowned 1,800 year-old Famen Buddhist Temple (aka Dharma Gate Temple) outside Xi’an, China, this project is one of the largest architectural and landscape commissions in the world focused around an historic religious temple.More images and architects' description after the break.

Infographic: Saving the Earth with Sustainable Cities

With Stockhom, Hamburg and Copenhagen leading the way, urban metropolis’ worldwide are beginning to rethink their infrastructure and envision ways to transform their city into an efficient, sustainable model of the future in an effort to preserve a high quality of life and stay competitive in the global society. This shift is already being reflected in the education system, with the rapid growth of sustainability-focused academic programs and a sizable, projected increase in “green” jobs. 

Get an understanding as to how sustainable cities will save the earth with an infographic after the break

Another Round of Human Rights Violations for the Sake of the Olympic Games: Sochi 2014

Imminent domain has a new justification and it's called the Olympic Games. Once again, the anticipation of the Olympics brings to light the slew of human rights violations that are permitted by countries as they prepare to host the games. So what is the real cost of hosting the Olympic Games? We posed this question on ArchDaily last year in regards to Rio de Janeiro's pick for hosting the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympic Summer Games. http://www.archdaily.com/214726/rio-de-janeiros-favelas-the-cost-of-the-2016-olympic-games/ And here we are again, looking at the controversies that surround building the site of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia which has been preparing for the games for six years now since it won its bid in 2007. If Brazil's practices with the favelas struck a nerve with human rights groups, Sochi's is sure to spark more controversy. Every time the International Olympic Committee sits down to choose the next host city, cities all over the world jump at the opportunity to impress, hoping that they will be chosen for the global celebration of human feats and accomplishments. As spectators, we are assured that cities can only benefit from being chosen to host the events. They bring tourism, new architectural projects, and global recognition. They encourage city infrastructure to develop and upgrade. They inspire measures that clean up a city, make it "presentable"; and eventually they raise the standard of living for residents. However, they also have the capacity to infringe on the rights and dignity of the very people whose land is being leased to this global event. The massive buildings that host the events have to be built somewhere, and often they are built in the disadvantaged neighborhoods that haven't the political leverage to fight against imminent domain. We've seen this happen in different versions to varying degrees, and we're seeing it now in Sochi as neighborhoods are destroyed, homes are razed, and life becomes unbearable for those still living among the construction and pollution with no means to relocate. The global community looks on in horror as reports like Anna Nemtsova's for ForeignPolicy.com (http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/04/11/russia_s_olympic_city) reveal the treatment of citizens to make room for the infrastructure that supports the Olympics. Nemtsova gives some insight into the status of these projects and their affects on communities: The rising concrete wall (set to be 12 feet high upon completion) is about to cut off Acacia Street's view of the mountains -- and, indeed, of the rest of the world. During rainstorms, bulldozers push mud into residential courtyards, where the dirty water floods residents' basements, destroying floors and furniture. Mold is creeping up the walls in homes, filling the air with a rotten-garbage smell. Last month, Sochi City Hall filed a lawsuit against Acacia Street inhabitants who haven't been willing to demolish their own outhouses, kitchens, and water pumps that happen to be in the way of the construction of a new federal highway. But what happens here is not just a human rights issue that leaves people disenfranchised. This otherwise idyllic get-away city has been transformed by the massive construction undertaking and in some cases has become an ecological disaster as well. Greenpeace an World Wildlife Fund have both expressed concern over the construction that is poisoning the lakes which are a crucial ecological site for migrating birds. And community protest and activism in regards to their own condition has gone unregistered by President Putin, according to Nemtsova. The Atlantic (http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/12/sochi-2014-an-olympic-preview/100422/) posted some progress photos from the construction late last year. These images are bittersweet. On the one hand they show growth, construction, progress and the majesty and grandiosity that we associate with this celebration. On the other hand, we see photos of demolished, scattered rubble, and construction sites where there once were neighborhoods. It's sad to think that this global celebration has so many casualties. Is this something that was always the case, the unmentionable part of the Olympic Games? Or has it become more acceptable to bulldoze neighborhoods for the sake of the games and declare imminent domain without regard for the people or the place? And what can we do differently next time? While the global community watches and comments, it largely turns a blind eye to these developments, permitting them to perpetuate year after year.

Emergency Clinic + Clinic for Infectious Diseases / LINK arkitektur + CF Möller

  • Architects: LINK arkitektur, CF Möller
  • Location: Skånes universitetssjukhus, Inga Marie Nilssons gata 10, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden
  • Area: 25800.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Courtesy of LINK Arkitektur

Courtesy of LINK Arkitektur Courtesy of LINK Arkitektur Courtesy of LINK Arkitektur Courtesy of LINK Arkitektur

‘Flying Saucer’ Condominium Proposal / 5468796 Architecture

Set for completion in 2014, Winnipeg’s “Flying Saucer” condominium project 62M, designed by Winnipeg-based studio 5468796 Architecture, will occupy the corner of MacDonald Avenue and Waterfront Drive, close to the Exchange District. Named after its address, 62M will be a two-storey, circular building lifted up on 35-foot stilts. Its circular design is spatially efficient and will provide each unit with a view. As a whole, the 360° plan provides the widest possible perimeter for glass with the smallest amount of exterior envelope to construct. More images and architects' description after the break.

La Luciole Concert Hall / Moussafir Architectes Associés

  • Architects: Moussafir Architectes Associés
  • Location: 171 Rue de Bretagne 61000 Alençon, France
  • Design Team: Jacques Moussafir with Francesca De Marchi, Nicolas Hugoo, Alexis Duquennoy, Guillaume Cournut, Laurent Théaux and Albert Ruiz
  • Area: 1274.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2008
  • Photographs: Luc Boegly, Moussafir Architectes Associés

© Luc Boegly © Luc Boegly © Luc Boegly © Luc Boegly

Portland Oregon to Portland Place in London

Having started this past Thursday, April 25th, and concluding in July, a team of British riders are cycling from Portland Oregon to Portland Place London with the intent of studying how cities are coping with the increasing interest in the bicycle as a credible form of urban transport. The riders will be making comparative analyses of the 12 major cities they ride through including how they are providing facilities and infrastructure for cycling. They, they will ride through the cities to experience cycling facilities directly and talking to local architects, cyclists and policy makers. On our return we will compare our findings with other expert groups, before publishing the research in print and digital formats. For more information, please visit here. A video of the event can be viewed after the break.

Haus Wiesenhof / Gogl Architekten

© Mario Webhofer
© Mario Webhofer
  • Architects: Gogl Architekten
  • Location: St. Johann i. Tirol
  • Architect in Charge: Regine Egg-Mitter, Hildegard Platzer-Rieder
  • Lighting Planning: Akzente Lichtsysteme
  • Area: 565.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Mario Webhofer

© Mario Webhofer © Mario Webhofer © Mario Webhofer © Mario Webhofer