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  3. As Phyllis Lambert Turns 90, Exhibition Examining Her Impact and Influence Opens in Montréal

As Phyllis Lambert Turns 90, Exhibition Examining Her Impact and Influence Opens in Montréal

As Phyllis Lambert Turns 90, Exhibition Examining Her Impact and Influence Opens in Montréal
As Phyllis Lambert Turns 90, Exhibition Examining Her Impact and Influence Opens in Montréal, Phyllis Lambert, David Sharpe, Myron Goldsmith, Jin Hwan Kim, and an unidentified student at a Master Class Studio at the Illinois Institute of Technology (1961). Image © Fonds Phyllis Lambert (CCA)
Phyllis Lambert, David Sharpe, Myron Goldsmith, Jin Hwan Kim, and an unidentified student at a Master Class Studio at the Illinois Institute of Technology (1961). Image © Fonds Phyllis Lambert (CCA)

This week Phyllis Lambert, widely considered to be among the most influential figures in architecture, turned 90. Known primarily for founding the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in her hometown of Montrèal in 1979, she also acted as Director of Planning for the world-renowned Seagram Building in Manhattan (a tower commissioned by her family). The project is often cited as one of Mies van der Rohe's most important built works. As a practising architect, Lambert designed the Saidye Bronfman Centre (1967) – a performing arts center named after her mother.

Exterior of Saidye Bronfman Centre at night (1968). Courtesy of the Richard Nickel Committee, Chicago, Illinois. Image © Richard Nickel Composite photograph of Phyllis Lambert and David Fix in their Chicago studio (1970). Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Pier Associates Seagram Building: view from northwest at dusk. Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Ezra Stoller / Esto Phyllis Lambert and Gene Summers (1976). Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Pier Associates +7

On the occasion of her birthday, the CCA—for which Lambert currently holds the position of Founding Director Emeritus—are staging an exhibition offering an autobiographical glimpse into the evolution of her ideas and work as an architect, activist, editor, and curator. According to the organisation, the show highlights Lambert's "deep commitment to the city and to intellectual research." It will display archival material from the CCA’s collection, other institutional archives, along with Phyllis Lambert's own personal archives in order to "reveal the consistent radicalism of her life."

Composite photograph of Phyllis Lambert and David Fix in their Chicago studio (1970). Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Pier Associates
Composite photograph of Phyllis Lambert and David Fix in their Chicago studio (1970). Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Pier Associates
Exterior of Saidye Bronfman Centre at night (1968). Courtesy of the Richard Nickel Committee, Chicago, Illinois. Image © Richard Nickel
Exterior of Saidye Bronfman Centre at night (1968). Courtesy of the Richard Nickel Committee, Chicago, Illinois. Image © Richard Nickel
Seagram Building: view from northwest in the afternoon. Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Ezra Stoller / Esto
Seagram Building: view from northwest in the afternoon. Courtesy of the CCA. . Image © Ezra Stoller / Esto
Courtesy of the CCA.
Courtesy of the CCA.

Phyllis Lambert to Receive Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at Venice Biennale

Phyllis Lambert Receives the 2016 Wolf Prize for the Arts in Israel

Phyllis Lambert Wins Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize 2016

Cite: AD Editorial Team. "As Phyllis Lambert Turns 90, Exhibition Examining Her Impact and Influence Opens in Montréal" 25 Jan 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/803681/phyllis-lambert-90-exhibition-examining-impact-influence-opens-cca-montreal/>
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