Paraty House / Marcio Kogan

© Nelson Kon

Architect: Marcio Kogan
Location: Paraty, RJ,
Co-Author: Suzana Glogowski
Interior Design: Diana Radomysler, Carolina Castroviejo
Project Team: Beatriz Meyer, Eduardo Chalabi, Eduardo Glycerio, Gabriel Kogan, Lair Reis, Luciana Antunes, Maria Cristina Motta, Mariana Simas, Oswaldo Pessano, Renata Furlanetto, Samanta Cafardo
Landscape Architect: Gil Fialho
General Contractor: Lock Engenharia
Structural Engineering: SF Engenharia
Site Area: 50,000 sqm
Project Area: 840 sqm
Project Year: 2008-2009
Photographs: Nelson Kon

There is a legend which says that the region of the colonial city of Paraty and Angra dos Reis (between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro) has 365 islands, one for each day of the year. Two boxes of reinforced , rest fixed connected on the mountainside of one of these islands; two modern prisms between the large colossal stones of the Brazilian coast. The volumes project outward from the mountain, almost abreast of the beach, in a 8-meters cantilever. The house, of structural ingenuity, finds balance in the topography of the land, constituting an extensive open doorway and living space in the practically-untouched nature. In the rocks of Paraty, in the dense rain forest of the island, poisonous spiders, discover this orthogonal volume and penetrate the grass that coats the slab. Moving their fore and hind legs quickly, they reclaim the site. The spiders continue on their way into the house and penetrate into an important furniture collection of the XX century designed, among others, by George Nakashima, Luis Barragan, Lina Bo Bardi, Sérgio Rodrigues, Joaquim Tenreiro and José Zanine Caldas. The spiders become lost in the upholstered chair.

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© Nelson Kon

The inhabitants arrive by boat: the entrance to the house, already protected by the slab, after stepping on the sand, is via a metallic bridge positioned over a crystal-lined reflecting pool. The bridge leads to stairs connecting to the lower volume. This volume contains part of the program of the house: living room, kitchen and service area. The continual internal area has a 27-meter span and huge glass windows allow for the view, the sea.

© Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon

The same entrance stairs lead to the upper volume which lodges the bedrooms. In the front part of the house, retractile panels of eucalyptus sticks protect the bedrooms from the sun. The spaces that face the mountain, have small internal patios with zenital lighting and the use of exposed reinforced concrete grants a striking texture to the walls.

© Nelson Kon

The entire top of the house is covered with terraces, observatories for the inhabitants, for the poisonous spiders, or garden for the sculptures and for the medicinal plants and edible herbs.

Cite: "Paraty House / Marcio Kogan" 26 Aug 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=74934>
  • Ozmoto

    I’m awe of very angle… the concrete work is perfect. What a masterpiece.

  • guilherme Torres

    A masterpiece!

  • http://www.individual.cl/ æon

    yeah, the blocks seem to be floating on the air

  • http://www.amonle.com amonle

    one word (ok, two) … a classic!

  • http://www.fredericozanelato.com Frederico Zanelato

    Another marvelous work of Brazilian architecture!

  • sullka

    Nothing wrong can be said about Marcio Kogan, the guy’s a master and he has the wealthiest clients.

    His engineer is amazing as well, the whole third floor rests only on the stairwell wall and in a tiny piece of the master’s bedroom corner.

  • Arquipablo

    OMG!…the heaven in earth….paradise!….

    Is like a house from “the indredibles” movie…

    Great

  • Leonardo Ximenes

    I don’t even know where to start…what a brutal exageration of program: 4 levels of wasted space organized to produce ostentation. The use of a box to frame views and create inside/outside interactions is clever and never old, but two boxes, one on top of the other, just wrecks the overall composition. The house looks presumptuous and overdone, which is ironic, since brutalist prismatic forms seek to achieve the opposite effect. And ’sustainability’?? just imagine the impact of the huge concrete slab that anchors the entire thing to the sand ground of an island! If Bucky Fuller asked his famous question ‘how heavy is your building’, can you imagine the answer on this case?
    I usually admire Kogan’s creations; this is by far his worst job, an aberration of his language that hopefully won’t ever happen again. To my colleages, I beg you to take a second, more careful look. We justly criticize millionaries who build Mcmansions that look like an 18 century castle for they childish desire of a kinglike life. This is the same thing, but using contemporary language.We should learn to be responsible professionals serving not only a client, but the entire society.

    • edub

      [quote]
      don’t even know where to start…what a brutal exageration of program: 4 levels of wasted space organized to produce ostentation. The use of a box to frame views and create inside/outside interactions is clever and never old, but two boxes, one on top of the other, just wrecks the overall composition. The house looks presumptuous and overdone, which is ironic, since brutalist prismatic forms seek to achieve the opposite effect. And ’sustainability’?? just imagine the impact of the huge concrete slab that anchors the entire thing to the sand ground of an island! If Bucky Fuller asked his famous question ‘how heavy is your building’, can you imagine the answer on this case?
      I usually admire Kogan’s creations; this is by far his worst job, an aberration of his language that hopefully won’t ever happen again. To my colleages, I beg you to take a second, more careful look. We justly criticize millionaries who build Mcmansions that look like an 18 century castle for they childish desire of a kinglike life. This is the same thing, but using contemporary language.We should learn to be responsible professionals serving not only a client, but the entire society.
      [/quote]

      ^^THIS!!

    • Arquipablo

      Im not agrre with you…but, personally, I would prefer a simply design, because the landscape is the most important thing in this case….however, this house have a great desing anway…all depends of taste..

    • ianexpress

      go and hug a tree. This house is incredible and the fact that is expensive should not be an issue at all, we are admiring the art behind it, not your social stand in life

  • http://www.oneofmennie.carbonmade.com Nathan

    Holy cr*p this actually looks like a Bond villans secret hideout. Wheres the shark pool….

  • http://www.fgoesarte.blogspot.com FELIPE GOES

    Great House !

  • damian

    Great “party” house :D

  • Paul

    Sharks in the pool would make this complete.

  • Chris

    It is quite lovely. Manages to be rustic and luxurious simultaneously.

    2 issues I have with it though;

    The kitchen layout makes for a loong walk from one side of the counter to the other.

    The text about the poisonous spiders makes me want to bash my head in with a shovel.