Whole Foods Set to Build First Commercial-Scale Greenhouse on Brooklyn Rooftop

via Fast Co.Design

has teamed up with ’s local organic grower, Gotham Greens, to build the first commercial-scale greenhouse attached to a supermarket. The 20,000-square-foot greenhouse, expected to open in Brooklyn this Fall, will provide locally grown produce year-round to nine Whole Foods stores in City area. 

“Gotham Greens has been a valued local supplier of high quality, flavorful and fresh produce to Whole Foods Market since early 2011, making this greenhouse project a natural and extremely exciting next step in our relationship,” says Christina Minardi, Northeast Regional President of Whole Foods. “We’re particularly excited to partner with a local organization with roots right here in Brooklyn and a mission in line with our own, in that we both care deeply about providing local, fresh and sustainably produced food.”

via Organic Connections

Aside from the obvious sustainable benefits of providing locally grown, organic produce, the state-of-the-art greenhouse will be outfitted with enhanced glazing materials and electrical equipment that will cut energy use, while its efficient irrigation systems will use up to 20 times less water.

In addition, Gotham Greens known method of growing food hydroponically in rooftop greenhouses powered by solar energy allows them to produce 7 to 8 times the amount of food than a traditional solar farm in the same six acre lot.

Gotham has become known as one of New York’s most prominent urban farmers since its founding in 2008. Currently, they produce 80 tons of fresh herbs and vegetables, which are sold to local supermarkets, restaurants and institutional costumers.

References: Fast Co.ExistSustainable BusinessGotham GreensOrganic Connections 

Cite: Rosenfield, Karissa. "Whole Foods Set to Build First Commercial-Scale Greenhouse on Brooklyn Rooftop" 04 Apr 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 20 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=355364>

2 comments

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    How will WF manage irrigation with the market so close to the ‘toxic’ Gowanus Canal…?

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