Bloomberg Announces Plan For Downtown Brooklyn

32-Story Tower at Lafayette and Ashland, Courtesy of TEN Arquitectos. Via The Architect’s Newspaper

In recent years Downtown Brooklyn has become somewhat of a hub of cultural activity.  Just past the triangular intersection of Flatbush Ave and Fulton Street, a high density of cultural buildings, expansive retail, and entertainment exists.  Mayor Michael Bloomberg of NYC announced in late November that the city and private companies will be partnering to produce three new projects in this area that will bring affordable housing and additional cultural and community spaces to Downtown Brooklyn.  This last city-owned parcel will be developed into mixed use facilities: a 515,000 square foot building at Fulton St, Rockwell Place and Ashland Place; a 32-story mixed use building on Flatbush and Lafayette to be designed by Enrique Norten of TEN Arquitectos and a third building currently in the RFP stage of development at Ashland Place and Lafayette.

Join us after the break for more.

As these developments move forward, the whole of Downtown Brooklyn is getting something of a facelift.  Fulton Mall, the stretch between Flatbush Ave and Joralemon Street, has been introducing higher-end stores and redeveloping some of the older buildings as well as creating new plazas, adding street furniture and building bicycle racks.  Further up Flatbush at Myrtle Ave, the intersection has become home to three condominium developments that were completed in recent years, upgrading amenities along Myrtle towards Fort Greene.

Downtown Brooklyn is generally a dense hub of activity.  Its programmatic diversity and accessibility makes it an attractive place for people to live and businesses to grow.  The government buildings at Borough Hall, the business and educational center of Metrotech, the retail of Fulton Mall and Atlantic Center, the cultural facilities at BAM and now the recently announced additional developments have and will continue to create a bustling and saturated hub that is active throughout the day.

The 515,000 SF development with provide 600 units of new housing, 50 percent of which will be affordable and 40 percent of the affordable units will be two-bedroom units.  The building will also contain 20,000 SF of cultural space and 20,000 SF of retain space.  The city hopes to get this project moving by late next year.  The 32-story building, designed by TEN Arquitectos is on a 47,000 SF lot that was purchased by private developer Two Trees.  Once approvals are settled, the building will begin construction.  It will include 50,000 SF of cultural space that will be shared between BAM, 651 ARTS, and the Brooklyn Public Library; 23,000 SF of retail space and 300 to 400 apartments, 20% of which will be affordable.

The sites will include public plazas for outdoor uses, encouraging dance and theater performances, film presentations, open air markets, craft fairs, and community gathering.  BAM will have the opportunity to expand is facilities and resources to its growing audience, the Brooklyn Public Library will open a new branch for the local community, and 651 ARTS will have a state of the art studio and rehearsal center that will include an educational and cultural center and performance spaces.

For the final development at Ashland Place and Lafayette, the City Department of Housing and Preservation has released an RFP for 100,000 SF of residential, community and commercial space with at least 15,000 SF devoted to cultural space and the arts.  Proposals are due Febryary 1, 2012.  Download the RFP here.

via The Archiect’s Newspaper by Aaron Seward
Cite: Vinnitskaya, Irina. "Bloomberg Announces Plan For Downtown Brooklyn" 10 Dec 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=304459>
  • Conway Pedron

    Why do none of these articles ever actually mention what the general price range is for the housing to qualify as “affordable”? Seems like a very subjective term… I guess a TEN Arquitectos unit is affordable for most people making 200k+ a year….

    • Ross

      According to http://envisioningdevelopment.net/affordable-housing, to be considered for low income units, you probably need to make 60% to 80% of the NYC median income which is $76,800 for a family of 4. At 60%, a family of 4 is expected to pay 30 of their income toward housing, or about $1150 a month. I think it really depends on the type or program of affordable housing used. But hey, I just read about it by downloading a pretty nice book here: http://www.anothercupdevelopment.org/affordablehousingbook.zip
      you can too! Its pretty interesting.

      So, someone making 200k a year would not qualify, but could probably afford to pay full price and live there anyway.

  • whoops

    looks like a giant apple store