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Verticalization: The Latest Architecture and News

Vertical Urbanization As Seen From Above

Because of the decrease in the availability of land area and the ever-increasing price per square meter, cities often tend to grow vertically. When we picture large metropolitan areas, we almost always imagine high-rise buildings, and the recognizable skyline becomes an icon that immediately evokes the places in which they are located.

New York, United States. Created by @overview, source imagery @maxartechnologiesDubai, United Arab Emirates. Created by @dailyoverviewSydney, Australia. Copyright: @tiarnehawkinsShanghai, China. Source imagery: @planetlabs+ 9

Vertical Greenery: Impacts on the Urban Landscape

With the increase of urban density and the decrease in the availability of land, the verticalization phenomenon has intensified in cities all over the world. Similar to the vertical growth of buildings — which is often a divisive issue for architects and urban planners — many initiatives have sought in the vertical dimension a possibility to foster the use of vegetation in urban areas. Vertical gardens, farms and forests, rooftop vegetable gardens, and elevated structures for urban agriculture are some of the many possibilities of verticalization in plant cultivation, each with its unique characteristics and specific impacts on the city and its inhabitants.

But is verticalization the ideal solution to make cities greener? And what are the impacts of this action in urban areas? Furthermore, what benefits of urban plants are lost when adopting vertical solutions instead of promoting its cultivation directly on the ground?

Courtesy of IlimelgoOne Central Park / Ateliers Jean Nouvel. Image courtesy of Frasers Property Australia and Sekisui House Australia. Image © Murray FredericksJapan introduces urban vegetable gardens in train stations. Courtesy of popupcity.net Bosco Verticale / Boeri Studio. Image: © Paolo Rosselli+ 7