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Vertical: The Latest Architecture and News

8 Urban Elevators That Bring Connectivity and Continuity to Cities

When working in an urban area with a complex topography, one of the biggest challenges is urban integration. Worldwide, many socially deprived neighborhoods are situated in complicated geographical locations surrounded by steep slopes. Such areas complicate mobility for pedestrians, cyclists, and the elderly, with a lack of accessibility often excluding them from taking part in city life effectively.

In this context, urban elevators can be a novel solution which combine elements of both functional connectivity and sculpture. With some rising up to 30 meters in height, they become urban and touristic landmarks, creating new viewpoints and walkways. Additionally, in many cases, they can help to uphold the historic legacy of the city.

Below we have collected some interesting examples of urban elevators that have been key in the spatial planning of the urban environment.

99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer

How can we plan a better city? The answer has confounded architects and urban planners since the birth of the industrial city. One attempt at answering came in the form of a spectacular modernist proposal outside of Amsterdam called the Bijlmermeer. And, as a new two-part episode by 99% Invisible reveals, it failed miserably. But, like all histories, the story is not as simple as it first appears.

Open Call-School of Architecture

Call me Architecture. I am a product of a way of thinking. Over the years, I have presented myself as a dream of civilizations. I have found myself layered endlessly, while my contemporaries have evolved into rather noteworthy images of their primitive selves. Although I am interpreted differently in many a space and time, I may mean the same. I see myself as an instrument to elucidate problems. My nature of debates may have changed and my discipline altered, but I have existed with one and only one purpose: to serve. I remember and I do reflect.