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Nasjonalmuseet: The Latest Architecture and News

Le Corbusier’s Paintings Showcased for the First Time Since 1966

Trois baigneuses, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP
Trois baigneuses, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

They say one cannot separate art from the artist, or perhaps in this case, the artist from the architect. Arguably one of the most criticized architects, Le Corbusier is often portrayed as cold and controlling. Depicting his more dreamy and humorous nature, the Nasjonalmuseet's exhibition titled, “Le Corbusier by the Sea,” draws upon his memories from his summer travels along the coast of southwest France.

Hosted in Villa Stenersen, one of the National Museum's venues, the exhibition showcases Le Corbusier's work as an artist during the period 1926-36. Not only does the exhibition include fifteen of his reproduced paintings alongside a collection of sketches, but also screens two films from Le Corbusier's own footage of his surrounding views.

Trois figures de femme et chien. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP Baigneuse, barque et coquillage. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP Le déjeuner près du pare, 1928. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP La pêcheuse d'huitres, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP + 8

In Therapy: Inside the Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

You are part of another’s shadow.
—Sverre Fehn in conversation with Per Olaf Fjeld

A central impetus for this exhibition is to acknowledge the presence of the ‘ghosts’ of Nordic architecture – those architects, theorists and educators—the most famous of which are often described as ‘Modern Masters’—who continue to exert influence on contemporary practice and pedagogy. Indeed, one of the most prominent of these gures, the Norwegian Sverre Fehn, designed the Nordic Pavilion. This exhibition addresses a common challenge faced by Finns, Norwegians and Swedes today: how can a building (or an exhibition, in this instance) exist in a dialogue with its setting when that setting is so charged? For us, this ties into a broader question: how can architecture occupy a legacy while still making progress?

The pyramid, built from Swedish pine, represents an inhabitable installation – an urban artefact in a very public pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Intimate "Rooms Without Walls" sit next to the main installation. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu The pyramid is a "discourse machine," designed to allow people to critically discuss the issues at the heart of the exhibition in an open air environment. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu The pyramid exists in dialogue with the building. Here, it's relationship with the existing staircase is made apparent. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 42

AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion at Expo '70 / Sverre Fehn

Though architectural history is replete with bricks, stones, and steel, there is no rule that states that architecture must be ‘solid’. Sverre Fehn, one of the most prominent architects of postwar Norway, regularly made use of heavy materials like concrete and stone masonry in his projects [1]. In this way, his proposal for the Nordic Pavilion at the Osaka World Expo in 1970 could be seen as an atypical exploration of a more delicate structure. Representing a very different aspect of ‘Modernity’ than his usual work, Fehn’s “breathing balloon” pavilion stands not only in contradiction to Fehn’s design canon, but to that of traditional architecture as a whole.

Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum + 10