All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Keneth Snelson

Keneth Snelson: The Latest Architecture and News

Tensegrity Structures: What They Are and What They Can Be

08:00 - 3 June, 2018
Tensegrity Structures: What They Are and What They Can Be , Buckminster Fuller <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/poetarchitecture/26806590126/in/photolist-GQNMjo-hESW2z-GMT4BP-ejcfv3-criycW-r4RXrm-qixJV2-3ZnJR-3ZnKg-5mMEfE-5mHpSD-5mMEDd-VR9y-VR7Y-VR9e-VR7D-VR8M-8y9tDo-8y6sNX-qnhPRv-sSPR3B-ta1L5A-sSFpTo-t7XFvh-t7Xf6u-t7WDZd-t7W8aY-sSFCyf-t7WNX3-sdgce7-sSGbAS-sSEAJd-sSH5eG-t7WeNY-sdsw7p-sdrtJa-t7WvQs-ta2Hj3-taiBsF-tagNuP-sSPTcM-t7WCsq-ta1wys-sSNNhP-ta2Tpo-sSFMmJ-sSPk8M-sdrEH4-ta2Jc5-sSHcrN'>©POET ARCHITECTURE via Flickr </a> Licence Public Domain Mark 1.0
Buckminster Fuller ©POET ARCHITECTURE via Flickr Licence Public Domain Mark 1.0

Through his extensive research, inventions and structural experiments, Buckminster Fuller created the term tensegrity to describe "self-tensioning structures composed of rigid structures and cables, with forces of traction and compression, which form an integrated whole" [1]. In other words, tensegrity is the property demonstrated by a system that employs cables (traction) and rigidity of other elements (usually steel, wood or bamboo) capable of acting under the intrinsic stresses (traction and compression) together and simultaneously, giving greater resistance and formal stability. It creates an interconnected structure that works biologically like muscles and bones, where one element strengthens the other.