Toshihiro Sobajima

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Is It Possible To Create Lightweight Bricks By Recycling Cigarette Butts?

Students at the School of Engineering, RMIT University recently published a study experimenting with a new form of waste management and recycling. As they note in their research, cigarette butts are the most commonly discarded single waste item in the world, with an estimated 5.7 trillion having been consumed around the globe in 2016. However, the materials in cigarette butts—particularly their cellulose acetate filters—can be extremely harmful to the environment due to poor biodegradability. The RMIT study builds on a previous research study by Mohajerani et. al (2016) that experimented with adding discarded cigarette butts to clay bricks for architectural use. In their research, the RMIT students found that such a measure would reduce the energy consumption of the brick production process and lower the thermal conductivity of the bricks, but that other issues including bacterial contamination would have to be addressed prior to successful implementation. Below, we explore this research in more detail, investigating its relevance to the architecture industry and imagining possible futures of application.

Built to Last: Stainless Steel's Contributions to Architecture

Shortly before the First World War, Harry Brearley (1871-1948), who had been working as a metalworker since he was 12 years old, developed the first stainless steel. Seeking to solve the problem of wear on the inner walls of British army weapons, he ended up obtaining a corrosion resistant metal alloy, and added chrome to the cast iron. The invention found applications in almost all industrial sectors including for the production of cutlery, health equipment, kitchens, automotive parts, and more, replacing traditional materials such as carbon steel, copper, and even aluminum. In civil construction, this was no different, and stainless steel was soon incorporated into buildings.

Compact House in Kuramae / Kawakubo Tomoyasu Architects & Associates

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 43

Plastic Moon House / N MAEDA ATELIER

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 34

Setagaya, Japan
  • Architects: N MAEDA ATELIER
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  206
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2009

Boltun Headquarters / Yasuhiro Yamashita x Atelier TEKUTO

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 24

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  155
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Daikin, Toto, Acor, Odelic, Sanwacompany

Split-Level Homes: 50 Floor Plan Examples

Faced with the challenge of designing homes on terrains with steep slopes - or in compact urban contexts that do not allow much variation in plan - several architects have experimented and proposed split-level homes to enhance the use of space, allowing, among other things, interesting visual perspectives.

These variations can be seen in numerous examples published on our site. Below, we have selected 50 examples that can help you in your next project. 

Nest at Amami Beach Villas / Atelier TEKUTO

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 52

  • Architects: Atelier Tekuto
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Elmes, Toto, Olivebricks, Sankyo Tateyama, Ueda Shikimono

R·torso·C / Atelier Tekuto

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Jérémie Souteyrat© Jérémie Souteyrat+ 9

Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Atelier Tekuto
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  103
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Dornbracht, Toto, Acor, Kitazawa Sangyo, Stoneworks

House of Komajii / Kazuyuki Takeda

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 30

  • Architects: Kazuyuki Takeda
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  100
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: NICHIHA, JIMBO ELECTRIC, Yoshino Gypsum Co.,Ltd.
  • Collaborators:Souraku Architects
  • Collaborators:Souraku Architects
  • City:Bunkyo
  • Country:Japan
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House in Nagoya / Atelier Tekuto

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 24

Nagoya, Japan

Machine Head / N MAEDA ATELIER

© Toshihiro Sobajima
© Toshihiro Sobajima
Machida, Japan
  • Architects: N MAEDA ATELIER
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  103 Area:  103
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2008 Year:  2008

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 33

Celluloid Jam / N MAEDA ATELIER

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 28

Nishi ward, Japan
  • Architects: N MAEDA ATELIER
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  80 Area:  80

Y-3 / Komada Architects' Office

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 17

Shibuya, Japan

KAP / Komada Architects' Office

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 15

Edogawa, Japan

S House / Komada Architects' Office

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 15

Suginami, Japan

RIBBON / Komada Architects' Office

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 16

Niigata, Japan

Climber´s House / Komada Architects' Office

© Toshihiro Sobajima
© Toshihiro Sobajima
Edogawa, Japan

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 18

HAT /

© Toshihiro Sobajima
© Toshihiro Sobajima
Setagaya, Japan

© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima© Toshihiro Sobajima+ 16