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Grant Mudford

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Sherman Residence / TOLO

13:00 - 16 August, 2017
Sherman Residence  / TOLO, © Grant Mudford
© Grant Mudford

© Grant Mudford © Grant Mudford © Grant Mudford © Grant Mudford + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Los Angeles, United States
  • Category

  • Design Team

    Peter Tolkin, John R. Byram, Christopher Girt, Craig Rizzo, Angela Uriu, Eric Townsend, Anthony Denzer
  • Area

    6500.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2001
  • Photographs

9 Preservation Projects Win 2017 Modernism in America Awards

14:10 - 21 June, 2017
9 Preservation Projects Win 2017 Modernism in America Awards

Nine projects have been announced as winners of Docomomo US’ 2017 Modernism in America Awards, honoring projects within the United States that highlight and advocate for the restoration of postwar architecture and landscapes.

Now in its fourth year, the Modernism in America Awards were founded to celebrate "the people and projects working to preserve, restore and rehabilitate our modern heritage sensitively and productively. The program seeks to advance those preservation efforts; to increase appreciation for the period and to raise awareness of the on-going threats against modern architecture and design."

Pierre Koenig’s Historic Case Study House #21 Could Be Yours... for the Right Price

07:00 - 7 November, 2016
Pierre Koenig’s Historic Case Study House #21 Could Be Yours... for the Right Price, © Grant Mudford
© Grant Mudford

One of modernism’s most iconic houses, Case Study House 21 (Bailey House) by Pierre Koenig, is now on sale. The two-bed/two-bath Hollywood Hills landmark has been touted as among the finest of Arts & Architecture Magazine’s Case Study Houses, and one of the program’s few truly experimental projects to explore groundbreaking design and materials.

© Grant Mudford © Grant Mudford © Grant Mudford © Grant Mudford + 21

A Delicate Endeavor: The Restoration of Modern Masterpieces by Schindler, Lautner, and The Eameses

01:00 - 16 May, 2014
A Delicate Endeavor: The Restoration of Modern Masterpieces by Schindler, Lautner, and The Eameses, Ehrlich Architects’ restored Rudolf Schindler house in Inglewood, Calif. Image © Grant Mudford
Ehrlich Architects’ restored Rudolf Schindler house in Inglewood, Calif. Image © Grant Mudford

How do you make a space more livable by current standards, while simultaneously upholding the original architect's design intentions? It's a delicate endeavor, but one that was recently accomplished by a couple of architects in Southern California. Originally published by AIArchitect as "Pacific Coast Sun Rises on Modernist House Restorations," this article investigates the thoughtful restorations of three homes designed by the pioneering modernists Rudolph Schindler, John Lautner, and Charles and Ray Eames.

Los Angeles’ early Modernist pioneers are no longer around to oversee the restoration of homes they designed more than a half-century ago, but their landmark projects are offering a new generation of designers historic case studies in Modernist preservation that grow more and more significant with each passing day. Vintage architectural renderings and drawings, photos, and notes are all ingredients these architects use to summon the spirits of Rudolph Schindler, John Lautner, and Charles and Ray Eames, to name a few, bringing their early works of California Modernism back to life.

9 Architects Reflect on the Homes That Most Inspired Them

01:00 - 1 May, 2014
The homes that inspire architects.
The homes that inspire architects.

Where do you receive inspiration? Nalina Moses asked the question to nine contemporary residential architects, asking each to choose one residence that had left an impression on them. The following answers were first published on the AIA’s website in the article “Homing Instinct."

When nine accomplished residential architects were asked to pick a house—any house—that has left the greatest impression on them as designers, most of their choices ran succinctly along the canon of American or European Modern architecture. Two—Alvar Aalto’s Villa Mairea and Pierre Chareau’s La Maison de Verre—were even tapped twice.

If the houses these designers chose weren’t surprising, the reasons they chose them were. Rather than groundbreaking style or technologies, what they cited were the moments of comfort, excitement, and refinement they offered: the restful proportions of a bedroom, the feel of a crafted wood handrail, an ocean view unfolding beyond an outdoor stair.