Audrey Migliani

Audrey Migliani is an architect and urban planner (2013), with a master's degree in architecture from USJT-SP (2016). She is an ArchDailyer since February 2014. She is also a researcher in "Ambiente Preparado" where she studies the benefits and possibilities of spaces designed for children, on the scale of the home and the city. She was part of the Núcleo Docomomo-SP team between 2014 and 2019.

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS AUTHOR HERE

Children's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's Furniture

Montessori Kindergarten in Xiamen / L&M DesignPhoto: 1931, Kaunas, Lithuania. Two children working on reading/writing words at Maria Varnienė's Children's House. The child on the left is Stasys Ragaišis, who later became a medical doctor.. Image via @montistory101Mi Casita Preschool and Cultural Center / BAAO + 4Mativ Design Studio. Image © Lesley UnruhPeter Keler - Puppenwagen, 19xx. Image via Wikimedia+ 53

Children's furniture is all furniture –fixed or mobile– that is designed according to the ergonomic guidelines and anatomical dimensions of children specifically. Following this definition, we can identify two types of furniture: (1) those that facilitate a relationship between the caregiver and the child, and (2) those that allow the child to use them independently.

The big difference between these two types is that the first has dimensions that mainly adapt to the ergonomics of the adult, while the second is designed to meet the ergonomic needs of the child at each stage of their development. Since the growth of children occurs relatively quickly, it is common for the furniture of this second group to be multifunctional or even extendable.

Pikler Pedagogy in Architecture: Wooden Furniture and Spatial Freedom

Emmi Pikler was a Hungarian pediatrician who introduced, in the years after World War II, a new philosophy on early childhood care and learning for children up to the age of 3. It was after the birth of her first child that she began to question: what happens when a child is allowed to develop freely? The observed results culminated in the introduction of a new methodology.

The Pikler approach facilitates the free development of children by caring for their physical health and providing affection but largely respecting their individuality and autonomy. Following this logic, intervention by adults becomes mostly unnecessary. Rather, for the child to experience space while moving freely, certain care must be taken in the preparation of the environments themselves.

Strategies to Improve Study Spaces at Home

Peach Arquitetura e Design / Peach. Image © Haruo MikamiResidência para Quatro / Harry Thomson. Image © Lenny CoddCasa Blank / HAO Design. Image Cortesia de Hey! CheeseApartamento RMP / Triplex Arquitetura. Image © Ricardo Bassetti+ 23

In early 2020, along with the implementation of worldwide social isolation measures, we published several articles in order to help our readers increase productivity and comfort in their home offices. After months of continued isolation, surveys show that more than 80% of professionals want to continue working from home even after quarantine ends. In addition, a good number of companies are similarly satisfied with current work practices, showing a high tendency to adopt this practice indefinitely, since the majority of companies observed that remote work was as or more productive than face-to-face work.

However, with respect to children and home studying during the pandemic, the result was not as positive. One of the main reasons for this difference is that it can be difficult to get students to concentrate and motivate themselves for a long time in front of screens. Lack of physical interaction with other children is also a contributing factor. Yet until the global situation improves, it is likely that the return to schools will continue to be postponed. With this situation in mind, we decided to share in this article a series of efficient strategies to transform study spaces at home into better spaces for learning.

Improving the Educational Environment with the Reggio Emilia Approach

Redbridge School / ARX Portugal Arquitetos. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SGCreche Leimond-Shonaka / Archivision Hirotani Studio. Image © Noriko MomoiKindergarten in Guastalla / Mario Cucinella Architects. Image © Moreno MaggiCentro Infantil El Guadual / Daniel Joseph Feldman Mowerman + Iván Dario Quiñones Sanchez. Image © Ivan Dario Quiñones Sanchez+ 48

The Reggio Emilia Approach was created in the post-WWII period at the initiative of widowed mothers and under the coordination of journalist and educator Loris Malaguzzi. In a time of postwar urban reconstruction, the group's primary concern was the formation of new schools, where they wanted to create a peaceful, welcoming, and cheerful environment, with a domestic atmosphere where children could stay while their mothers worked. Understanding the children's interests and providing a suitable environment for exploration and experimentation is one of the focal points of this pedagogy. The creation of a safe and stimulating environment is so fundamental that, in much literature, it appears as a third teacher.

Neuroarchitecture Applied in Children's Design

Jardim de Infância SP / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji InoueEscola Nía / Sulkin Askenazi. Image © Aldo C. GraciaPlayville Day Care / NITAPROW. Image © Ketsiree WongwanBiblioteca da Escola Umbrella / Savana Lazaretti Arquitetura e Design Sensorial. Image © Renata Salles+ 21

It is unquestionable that environments directly influence the behavior and emotions of their users. Human beings spend approximately 90% of their lives indoors, making it imperative that the spaces we inhabit stimulate positive behavior and emotions, or at least don't influence us negatively. There exists a specific term describing the stimuli that the brain receives from its environment: neuroarchitecture. Several studies have been published on this topic, most focusing on its impact on work environments. This article approaches this concept through a different, yet essential lens: emphasizing its importance in the design of spaces for children in early childhood.

Monochromatic Kitchens: 3 Design Strategies with a Single Color

Apartament in Korydallos / Plaini and Karahalios Architects. Image © Nikos PapageorgiouTetrys 607 Apartament / CR2 Arquitetura. Image © Cris FarhatJade Residence / E/L Studio. Image © Pepper WatkinsApartament in Korydallos / Plaini and Karahalios Architects. Image © Nikos Papageorgiou+ 29

A monochrome environment is a space in which most architectural elements are of a single color. Although it is common for architects to design black or white monochromatic spaces due to its neutrality, it is possible to use almost any color to design a space, taking advantage of their infinite tones, undertones, and shades.

Schools of the Future: How Furniture Influences Learning

It is a student's right to be educated in a safe, healthy, and even aesthetically appealing environment, especially young students for whom these factors are even more important. For example, it has been shown that when the ergonomics of chairs are inadequate, they can greatly affect levels of concentration and the development of skills such as calligraphy. At the same time, the effectiveness of traditional teaching methods is increasingly being questioned and the quality of alternative methodologies increasingly being considered. In other articles, we discussed in more detail the design of Montessori schools and the atmosphere of Waldorf interiors.

Today, we will cover the importance of choosing furniture and address some aspects to consider when organizing them in classroom design for the schools of the future.

Itoi Elementary School / Atelier BNK. Image © Koji SakaiNursery School in Berriozar / Javier Larraz + Iñigo Beguiristain + Iñaki Bergera. Image © Iñaki BergeraLedeer Daycare Center / Credohus. Image © Hong LiMRN Kindergarten and Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Studio BAUHAUS+ 17

How to Minimize Harmful Effects of Formaldehyde Gas Indoors

As people are spending more and more time inside their homes, offices, and other closed areas, it is important to ensure that these spaces are safe and healthy environments, especially indoor areas designed for children and seniors. In recent years, several of the materials that shape the spaces we inhabit and directly influence the quality of the air we breathe have increasingly used a potentially dangerous chemical compound. This compound is called formaldehyde.

How to Design Schools and Interiors Based on Waldorf Pedagogy

Introduced by Rudolf Steiner, Waldorf pedagogy draws on the principles of anthroposophical philosophy. One of the theory's foundational characteristics is its holistic approach to the human being: feelings, imagination, spirit, and intellect are considered unique to every individual, and thoughts, feelings, and actions are understood to always be linked.

Thus, the focus of the philosophy is to cultivate individuals who are capable of relating both to themselves and to society (inter and intrapersonal intelligence) - fundamental skills for overcoming the challenges of the 21st century. This kind of learning takes place in schools that follow Steiner's method, introducing families to the school environment and bringing them into the community. Below, we review the operations and implications of this pedagogy. 

Yellow Train School / Biome Environmental Solutions. Image © Vivek MuthuramalingamAfter-School Care Centre Waldorf School / MONO Architekten. Image © Gregor SchmidtMarecollege / 24H Architecture. Image Cortesia de Boris ZeisserEscola El Til·ler / Eduard Balcells + Tigges Architekt + Ignasi Rius Architecture. Image © Adrià Goula+ 19

Where Will the Children Play? How to Design Stimulating and Safe Cities for Childhood

'Cities for Play' is a project whose main objective is to inspire architects and urban planners to create stimulating, respectful, and accessible cities for children.

Natalia Krysiak, its creator, is an Australian architect who believes that children's needs should be placed at the center of urban design to ensure resilient and sustainable communities. In 2017, she produced 'Cities for Play,' studying examples of cities that are concerned with providing environments that are capable of promoting the health and well-being – physical and emotional – of children through a focus on play and "active mobility” in public spaces.

Indoor Playgrounds: Playful Architecture at Home

© Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue. ImageJardim de Infância SP / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro© Adam Mørk. ImageJardim de Infância Frederiksvej / COBE© Hey! Cheese. ImageLego Play Pond / HAO Design© Janez Marolt Photography. ImageJanez Marolt Photography+ 13

Although we know how important it is to allow children to play in public and outdoor spaces, it is difficult to deny that there are few cities offering adequate prepared environments for children - fun and safe spaces that allow them to experience urbanity and become conscious citizens of community life. For this reason, it is also understandable that families have increasingly instituted leisure spaces in indoor environments, giving their children the freedom and security necessary to learn and grow.

In this article, we have selected 11 incredible examples that demonstrate how interior architecture can help create play spaces for kids of all ages, helping them take their first steps in this world with greater autonomy and confidence.

How to Choose Pavements for High-Traffic Public Spaces

Currently, there are a multitude of pavements in the market, each with different characteristics. When designing a public space, it is essential to ask the right questions regarding requirements and functions to determine the right material for the job. To begin: Where will the pavement be installed? (Will it be protected, exposed, wet, or damp?). What level of traffic will it experience? (Light, moderate, or high?). What type of traffic will it experience? (Pedestrians, bicycles, light vehicles, or heavy vehicles?). What other factors should be considered based on preexisting conditions?

From these questions, it is possible to draw a more precise and effective profile of the "abrasion resistance" of the pavement, an important factor to guarantee the durability and efficiency of the material. Then, the aesthetic, functional, economic, and sustainable factors may be added.

© Grigoriy Sokolinsky. ImageRua Bolshaya Morskaya / AB CHVOYA + AM TRIAzatlyk - Praça Central de Naberezhnye Chelny / DROM. Image © Dmitry Chebanenko© Clément Guillaume. ImageEntrada de Chatenay Malabry / Ateliers 2/3/4/© Norbert Tukaj . ImageEspaço Público de Ogmios / DO ARCHITECTS+ 21

How do Solar Tiles Work?

Solar tiles operate identically to the photovoltaic panels that are already widely used in construction. The primary difference between them lies in their assembly: whereas photovoltaic panels are attached to an existing roof, solar tiles are part of the roof's construction from the start, taking the place of regular tiling.

The tiles are formed by photovoltaic cells that, when they receive sunlight, create an electric field capable of providing electrical energy for use inside the building. Each tile is connected by cables to the power distribution board.