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  3. Has Technology Diminished Our Understanding Of Public Space?

Has Technology Diminished Our Understanding Of Public Space?

Has Technology Diminished Our Understanding Of Public Space?
Has Technology Diminished Our Understanding Of Public Space?, St. Peter's Square through the lens of a camera. ImagePapal Conclave 2013, Vatican City
St. Peter's Square through the lens of a camera. ImagePapal Conclave 2013, Vatican City

In an article for the Washington Post, Philip Kennicott argues that "technology has scrambled the lines between public and private." He questions whether, in an age of "radical individualism" spurred on by our fascination with solitary communication, our collective understanding and appreciation for the public, civic space has been diminished. Kennitott foreshadows that "one thing is certain: We will live in more crowded spaces, and we will increasingly live indoors, cocooned in climate-controlled zones with a few billion of our closest friends" as rapid urbanisation merges with the changing climate.

Perhaps we are entering a new age of radicalism individualism, in which the very idea of enjoying public space together is giving way to something more anarchic and carnivalesque. Silence was once prized as a mark of success in many public spaces, including libraries, museums and concert halls; the vibrancy of many of those spaces, today, is measured by noise, hubbub and laughter.

Read the article in full here.

Cite: James Taylor. "Has Technology Diminished Our Understanding Of Public Space?" 05 May 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/627638/has-technology-diminished-our-understanding-of-public-space/> ISSN 0719-8884