Happy 107th birthday Philip Johnson!

by David La Chapelle. © LaChapelle Studio

Today, July 8th, is Philip Johnson‘s Birthday! (1906-2005)

The recipient of the very first Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979 and the American Institute of Architects’ Gold Medal, Johnson was described by Pritzker jurors as someone who “produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment. As a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.” In 1932, along with Henry-Russell Hitchcock, he curated the Modern Architecture: International Exhibition held at the Museum of Modern Art – at that moment, “The International Style” was born, and the course of modern architecture forever altered.

As we did last year, ArchDaily is celebrating with a special Glass House logo. Inspired by Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, The Glass House, with its perfect proportions and its simplicity, is still considered a modern marvel.

Learn more about Philip Johnsons’s work after the break…

Imagine Our Digital Future and Join the Glass House Conversations’ Last Online Dialogue

From left: Andy Warhol, David Whitney, , Dr. John Dalton, and Robert A. M. Stern in in 1964. © David McCabe

How can the web best inspire new dialogue? What does preservation mean in the digital world? How do you imagine your digital future? 

Since 2010, Glass House Conversations have brought together an illustrious group of hosts and participants from many creative disciplines, including architecture, art, design, landscape architecture, and preservation. Now, for their 100th and final online dialogue, the Glass House Conversations would like for you to consider the questions above and share your thoughts on our collective digital future here on their website.

The Conversation is open to comments from the public now through July 7, at 8pm ET.

The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”

just concluded their second annual Conversations in Context, which presents visitors with the opportunity to join in a weekly evening tour and intimate conversation with industry leaders, including Robert A.M. Stern, , and more.

Since the 1940s, The Glass House has served as a place of inspiration, education and conversation across creative disciplines. Its 49-acre landscape, 14 architectural structures and world-class art collection continue to draw members of an international creative community to participate in its rich story. Conversations in Context continues Philip Johnson’s legacy of using the Glass House as a place to conduct ongoing seminars with architecture students and present emerging and established architects the opportunity to discuss the current state of the industry.

The video above features Architect, critic, and historian Kenneth Frampton, along with Dean Mark Wigley from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. Follow us after the break for a few of our favorite conversations from this year’s series.

Continuing the Conversation / The Glass House / Philip Johnson

From left: Andy Warhol, David Whitney, , Dr. John Dalton, and Robert A. M. Stern in the Glass House in 1964. Photography by David McCabe

So, if you had to choose between a pencil, a knife, or a hammer as the only tool you could ever own, which would you choose and why? – John Maeda, the President of the Rhode Island School of Design, and this week’s guest moderator for the Glass House Conversations, asks us. These conversations have a rich history rooted in Johnson’s New Canaan creation. Not only did the Glass House offer an elegant example of Modern Architecture, the residence also played hostess to some of the greatest creative thinkers of the twentieth century. Described as “the longest running salon in America,” the Glass House witnessed dozens of intense conversations about art, architecture and society between Philip Johnson and David Whitney and their invited guests, including Andy Warhol, Frank Stella and . The conversations, not doubt, spurred debate, yet the meetings were the perfect opportunity to share ideas and philosophies that ultimately impacted our culture.