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P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S' Latest Expressive, Experimental Pavilion: Textile Room

This article originally appeared in Metropolis Magazine's Point of View Blog as "Working at the Crystalline Level."

Los Angeles-based P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S is among the most intriguing and progressive firms working in architecture today. They seem relentless in pushing boundaries in areas like ultra-light-weight high-tech materials and immersive media. They are also very thoughtful and patient in the way they approach design.

This is good because what they are engaged in and the way they work takes time. By collaborating with engineers and innovators in different industries they are slowly changing the way architecture is carried out and conceived on material and ontological levels. They don’t do spec homes, they do what’s new, and sometimes try to do what hasn’t been done yet.

Founder and co-principal Marcelo Spina and co-principal Georgina Huljich both teach, he at SCI-ARC and she at UCLA, where they pursue research interests with students and then reflect that back into their small but energetic practice tucked away in one of Los Angeles’ rustic urban edges, Atwater Village.

One thing to recently emerge from this office is the experimental carbon fiber pavilion they call Textile Room.

Bettery Magazine Q&A: Is Neighborhood Planning the New City Planning? A Conversation Between Peter Eisenman and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S

Bettery Magazine: Q&A Series. Is neighborhood planning the new city planning? Peter Eisenman asks P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S
Bettery Magazine: Q&A Series. Is neighborhood planning the new city planning? Peter Eisenman asks P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S

As part of its Question and Answer Series, Bettery Magazine, joined Peter Eisenman and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S to discuss the development of cities on an urban scale and the recent diversion of this development into the small scale of individual neighborhoods. What follows is a discussion that essentially describes the urban condition as a constant dialogue between scale and function.  

There is an unstoppable element of spontaneous development that is a result of the city's imposing forces as the scale of the individual and the immediate community.  Running concurrently with these developments are municipalities' own agendas that may start off as heavy-handed, but eventually become molded by the will of affected neighborhoods.  This dynamic nature of cities and their functionality is what makes their nature unique and in constant flux.  In response to Eisenman's question: "Is neighborhood planning the new city planning?", P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S addresses the balance of these two scales of development and discusses the four morphological states that city development could take.

Join us after the break for more.

4 Architects Among Recipients of $50,000 USA Fellowships

Although the amount may be nowhere near a MacArthur "genius grant," the $50,000 Prizes awarded by United States Artists are given on the same, awesome premise: no strings attached. 

This year's 50 recipients included visual artists, dancers, musicians - and 4 architect/designers. Check out the lucky 4, after the break...

In Progress: Jujuy Redux / P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S & Maxi Spina

© Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S & Maxi Spina
© Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S & Maxi Spina

Architects: P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S & Maxi Spina Location: Rosario, Argentina Principals: Marcelo Spina and Georgina Huljich (P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S), Maxi Spina (msa) Project Team: Rick Michod, Nathaniel Moore and Giuliana Haro, Assistants (P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S) Structural Engineer: Orengo & Associates Construction Company: D.R.S. Construcciones S.A. Project Management: Maxi Spina (msa) and Marcelo Spina (P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S) Project Area: 1,350 sqm Project Year: 2007-2011 Photographs: Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S & Maxi Spina