International Dance and Music Centre / Neutelings Riedijk Architects

Courtesy of

Neutelings Riedijk Architects is chosen as the winner of the architecture competition for the new building of the International Dance and Music Centre in city of The Hague, , among a field of 16 renowned international firms. More images and complete press release after the break.

Courtesy of Neutelings Riedijk Architects

The new IDMC brings together an 1800 seat Concert Hall, an 1100 seat Opera/Ballet Hall, a 500 seat Theatre and a 750 seat Ensemble Hall, rehearsal rooms, studio’s and educational spaces for the Royal Conservatory, the Netherlands Dance Theatre and The Hague Residential Orchestra. The project has a gross floor surface of about 45.000 m2 and an estimated building cost of about 120 million euro.

Courtesy of Neutelings Riedijk Architects

The project proposes a compact building volume to match the context of the old city center. In the center of the building the concert, opera and theatre halls are stacked on top of each other, imbedded in a flexible structure of classrooms and studio’s. The heart of the complex is an atrium with a monumental mountain of stairs that forms an escalator route as a continuation of the urban domain. It links all public areas and brings the visitors all the way up to the public roof terrace and cupola hall. The building is crowned with a 65-meter high cupola hall that can be used for all kinds of public events and performances. The filigree exo-skeleton gives the façade a refined and festive expression.

Cite: Jordana, Sebastian. "International Dance and Music Centre / Neutelings Riedijk Architects" 10 Dec 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 26 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=95366>

15 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    The competition must be rigged. Rigged competitions are the cancer of the whole profession. This is worst then the Dubai ThyssenKrupp Elevator competition winning “Frame” debacle.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I can’t believe this won a competition, and worst, I can´t believe someone feels proud enough of it to get it published.
    …among a field of 16 renowned international firms…????? I don’t buy it.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    This proposal seems to actually have a chance at bringing delight to the general public and the surrounding area. Just because it employs basic geometric primitives (besides the box) doesn’t mean it won’t be well revered. Show this to anyone other than an architect and see what reaction you get.

    More drama and ornament, please. Less architects who think they know better than the rest of society.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    I’m wondering where Neutelings wonderful sharpie diagram sketch is for this project. I agree with wurst in that this project to me aims to create an iconography that recalls the classic event that is going to a show, where it becomes a get dressed up, see and be seen affair. I’m actually quite intrigued by the vertically stacked performance core, especially at such a large scale. The only theater that I have been in with something similar was a renovation of an early 1900′s building by the Indiana Repertory Theater in downtown Indianapolis, but at a much smaller scale (theaters of 100-300 each).

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      very true, maybe not better but definitely different types of experiences. The “intelligence” of say zaha hadid’s forms or the cultural dissection of an OMA/AMO project may be more worthy of being designated art or capital A architecture, but most urban fabrics don’t need only these types of buildings to give a strong sense of identity and place.

  5. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I agree with the other comments that this looks like a joke. Moreover, the projected cost of 120 million is not even remotely realistic if you compare it to the costs of recently completed halls of similar size in Europe (Helsinki, Copenhagen etc.). You might get a concert hall OR an opera house for 120 million, not both.

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