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  7. Oak House High School Building / Trasbordo Arquitectura

Oak House High School Building / Trasbordo Arquitectura

  • 06:00 - 29 December, 2016
Oak House High School Building / Trasbordo Arquitectura
Oak House High School Building / Trasbordo Arquitectura, © Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca © Enrique Cabeza de Vaca © Enrique Cabeza de Vaca © Enrique Cabeza de Vaca +24

  • Client

    Oak House School
  • Studio

    Abraham Herreruela, Alberto Arroyo, Concepción Padilla
  • Structure

    EUTECA
  • Facilities

    BM Ingenierios
  • Construction Company

    Novantia Integral S.A.
  • Technical Architect

    Roberto López
  • More SpecsLess Specs
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

From the architect. Throughout human history, the expression genius loci has been given different meanings, reflecting man’s need to understand something beyond the physical presence and morphology of places.

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

The plot of land where Oak House School’s new building has been erected was laden with scenic meaning and the community’s own values. One of this project’s fundamental aims has been to listen to that meaning and conserve those values.

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

Division into two volumes meets the need to expose as much of the façade as possible to natural light and ventilation. The positioning of these volumes gives southward facing exposure to the largest possible area of the vertical surface. Their location conserves the original villa’s leisure area: the French garden.

Axonometric
Axonometric

The final form results from a dialogue between these strategies: Two material levels separated by a transparent strip. Above it, two suspended natural wood pavilions interact with and frame the original villa’s tower. Below it, a system of white concrete walls sunk into the land domesticates the topography, shapes the plot’s inner circulation and houses a small pre-university campus in the old French garden.

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

From an architectural point of view, this project’s solution arises from the dialectics between the upper and lower levels. In the semi-buried layer, the enveloping system is “monolithic”, in that it is formed by a single layer of material. In the aerial layer, the enveloping system is a multi-layered ventilated façade of dry-jointed wood. One is massive, the other light.

Section
Section

The monolithic layer, where a single material sustains, insulates, clads and contains the facilities, follows the way we have built for centuries: Greek temples, Florentine palaces, Gothic cathedrals and traditional adobe houses. In the design stage we requested CEMEX the possibility of creating a tailor-made concrete with specific levels of heat transfer and resistance for a white-finish concrete on both sides. It had to be very thick (45cm) to achieve the required comfort, given that, despite significant improvements in heat transfer, it was impossible to reach our specifications using conventional levels of thickness.

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

The aerial level, on the other hand, has been devised using the opposite construction system: a dry-joint ventilated façade. Here, the envelope is made with different overlapping layers, each of which plays a specific role, and which as a whole meet all the required specifications. Special mention should be made of the acetylated wood cladding “Accoya Wood”. This treatment modifies the organic structure of the wood, removing its hygroscopic properties, making it possible to leave the wood in a natural state, without varnish or woodstain.

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

From an environmental perspective: The project incorporates precise passive measures, which result in a lower demand for energy: Its semi-buried position and vegetation cover stabilise the interior temperature against the changes in the exterior climate. Exposure to light from the south captures the energy needed in winter, and the circulation spaces and shading systems protect the building from direct sunlight, eliminating the need for air conditioning in summer. 

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
Axonometric
Axonometric

Active measures are also incorporated, which translate into an efficient use of solar energy: The main source of energy is found at the site itself. The cooling and heating system gets its energy from the subsoil, via a geothermal energy system. 

© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca
Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Cite: "Oak House High School Building / Trasbordo Arquitectura" 29 Dec 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/802138/edificio-de-bachillerato-oak-house-school-trasbordo-arquitectura/>
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© Enrique Cabeza de Vaca

橡树屋高级中学大楼 / Trasbordo Arquitectura