SCALE: furniture/architecture/society / Breadtruck Films

Shot by architect turned filmmaker Jeffrey Durkin, this introspective piece on designer/architect/professor Miki Iwasaki explores how “the small objects in our life shape the big picture of how we live.”  What began as a video aimed to capture the essence of Iwasaki’s furniture design quickly transformed into a short piece which addresses larger issues of society and the ramifications of design and consumerism.

More about the video after the break.

As the name suggests, the short piece begins with Iwasaki’s passion for furniture where the designer stresses an emphasis on simplicity.  The furniture scattered on the walls of the studio and throughout the video are a testament to the designer’s ability to create beautiful timeless objects that speak to their material nature.

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Translating these ideas into architecture, it makes perfect sense that Iwasaki is against the “grand gestures” made by today’s signature architects.  Instead, the architect prefers the subtle unveiling of a well designed building that slowly reveals its layers of thought.

On the largest scale, Iwasaki shares a passionate conviction that architecture, at its best, can “begin to solve the problems of society.”   Through academia, Iwasaki has been able to guide not only young designers, but he has also been able to critically analyze and reflect upon his own work.

One of our favorite parts is at the very end of the piece when Iwasaki simply states that ideas take time to develop.  We love the strong closing remark that “It takes time to say what you want to say and figure out what you want to say”.  How true.  Enjoy the video and we look forward to sharing more of Durkin’s films with you on AD.

Currently, Iwasaki is a professor of architectural design in San Diego at Woodbury School of Architecture and the New School of Architecture.   a full time film-maker and founder of Breadtruck Films – a vehicle for the creative process.


Cite: Cilento, Karen. "SCALE: furniture/architecture/society / Breadtruck Films" 29 Jun 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 22 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=66442>