When Should Architects Say No? Five Renowned Architects Say Where They Draw the Line

  • 30 Apr 2014
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  • Architecture News
BIG’s 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

To design or not to design — that is the question. Our profession is one fraught with moral ambiguities — “from who you’re willing to take on as a client, to what kinds of structures you’re designing, to who will actually build it (and under what conditions).” In a fascinating article, Fast Company’s Shaunacy Ferro talks with five big-name architects to find out: where do you draw the line? Fentress Architects, for example, takes a hard line, refusing to design jails or any structure that conflicts with their beliefs. Bjarke Ingels, on the other hand, welcomes the opportunity to design in oppressively-led countries, such as Kazakhstan, because of the architecture’s potential for the people. See all five responses on Fast Company, and let us know where your moral compass lies in the comments below.

Cite: Quirk, Vanessa. "When Should Architects Say No? Five Renowned Architects Say Where They Draw the Line" 30 Apr 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 17 Sep 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=502112>

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