H-House / Widjedal Racki Bergerhoff

© Åke E:son Lindman
© Åke E:son Lindman

Architects: Widjedal Racki Bergerhoff
Location: Trosa,
Project Area: 240 sqm (interior) + 20 sqm (exterior refugee)
Project Year: 2006
Photographs: Åke E:son Lindman

© Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman © Åke E:son Lindman

A private residence in the archipelago of Stockholm situated on a beautiful site overlooking the ocean. The setting is scenic but the climate is harsh. Summers are light but short and the wind can often be a problem in these coastal areas. As in many of our projects great emphasis is put on exploring the border between inside and outside – protected and exposed – building and nature. 1/3 of the built area consists of outdoor areas under roof.

floor plan
floor plan
© Åke E:son Lindman
© Åke E:son Lindman

The H-shape helps creating intimate and wind protected courtyards that prolong the summer season. The main veranda is fully under roof and an open fireplace keeps temperature up during spring and fall. The social areas have concrete floors and are kept a bit rough. The private bedroom section is elevated from the concrete and less rough with dark wooden floor and interiors.

© Åke E:son Lindman
© Åke E:son Lindman

The main materials used are: concrete, rusty steel, untreated pine wood, oiled wenge and water. In this house, as well as in many of our projects, materials together with light rather than form gain focus and create atmosphere.

Cite: "H-House / Widjedal Racki Bergerhoff" 21 Dec 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=44134>

19 comments

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    This is a terrific example of the use of rigor and restraint in the application of the materials palette. Nothing is pointy or sticking out where it doesn’t need to be. The architecture has a genuine claim to being organic by virtue of a stunning success in conjoining the building and the site. Everything is oriented toward the view, which is made the warm center of the house.

    To me this shows that the principles of organic architecture are highly adaptable. This house is quite obviously oriented to take advantage of and defend from the Swedish climate. Some version of these principles could equally be applied in Southern California (and they have). An architect with excellent control and a sense of appropriateness can apply these principles anywhere.

    Terry Glenn Phipps
    http://www.facebook.com/tgpart

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