Manifesto House / James & Mau, for Infiniski

© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera

Project: Manifesto House
Architects: James & Mau
Location: Curacaví,
Built Area: 160 m2 ( + 15 m2 terraces 2nd floor)
Landscaping: Infiniski
General Contractor and manager: Infiniski
Renewable strategy: Infiniski + Geotek
Project year: 2009
Execution Time: 90 days
Total Cost: 79.000 €
Photograph: Antonio Corcuera
Furniture: Cómodo Studio, gt_2P

© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera

Infiniski designs and builds eco-friendly houses and buildings based on the use of recycled, reused and non polluting materials and the integration of alternative and renewable energy. The Infiniski projects are designed by James&Mau – Architects and designers,  Jaime Gaztelu and Mauricio Galeano, founders and partners of Infiniski. James & Mau offer Innovative and contemporary designs based on bioclimatic and modular architecture.  Infiniski is not only green, it is cheaper and faster … it tries to think the values of architecture and construction differently; a contribution to the needs of our changing environment.

© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
© Antonio Corcuera
Cite: "Manifesto House / James & Mau, for Infiniski" 16 Nov 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 31 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=41001>

24 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    chilean architecture is nice and well done but thats all, it is tendentious and with a big lack of character, this kind of houses seem to come more from a norweigian fiord instead from the place they are build.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    what makes the this house/cottage eco-friendly ? all that I can see is some used pallets and a rainwater storage container on the roof there seems to be no insulation so heating it wouldn’t be very efficient.

      • Thumb up Thumb down 0

        that’s a very good question, where’s the insulation. for your information pappoqula, houses in chile do need insulation, as a matter of fact, unless you have such a nice weather, with conditions that make the exterior temperature good enough for day&night/summer&winter comfort, you need insulation. and by the way, I’ve spent winters in curacavi(the place where this project is located) and let me tell you… it can be freezing cold.

        in my opinion, this project is just “green”, meaning trendy and fashionable, but not bioclimatical at all.

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      The two facades are two separate elevations. You can see this in the internal central staircase image. In response to ‘g dehis’ – it is also constructed from used shipping containers which would certainly reduce it’s embodied energy.

      • Thumb up Thumb down 0

        if that was so, then the photos of one of the facades would be mirror reversed. but i believe its not this way, because the front window beneath the cantilevered part is always the same – the opening part on the left side… makes no sense

      • Thumb up Thumb down 0

        Yes I hear you. Perhaps the photo was flipped? The image I referred to certainly shows two different cladding materials (crates and battens) to the flip up screens.

      • Thumb up Thumb down 0

        Right, they must have simply changed the siding. I mean, those white crates are rather cheeky. The sustainable wood slats look much better, calmer.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    More models! less sterile architecture!

    yummy yummy, im coming to bed in a sec honey!

    lets all be fertile!

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I’m tired of seeing this type of “cool”(?) architecture. In the end, behind a fancy name and a not-so-convincing “manifesto” there is only a really ugly house. A real shame considering the apparently amazing characteristics of the site.

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