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  5. Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
  6. 2013
  7. In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners’ Leadenhall Building became the tallest building in the City of London when it topped out on June 18th. The 50 story tower opposite Lloyd’s of London rises to a height of 224.5 meters 802 feet), its slender form creating its own distinctive profile within an emerging cluster London. The building’s tapering profile is prompted by a requirement to respect views of St Paul’s Cathedral, in particular from Fleet Street. The building comprises a number of distinct architectural elements that provide clarity to the composition both as a whole and as a legible expression of its constituent parts. These elements include the primary stability structure, the ladder frame, the office floor plates, the northern support core, the external envelope and the public realm.

More images and video of The Leadenhall Building after the break...

Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The tower’s design ensures that from this key vantage point the cathedral’s dome is still framed by a clear expanse of sky. The office floors, containing the highest quality office space, take the form of rectangular floor plates which progressively diminish in depth towards the apex. Instead of a traditional central core providing structural stability, the building employs a full perimeter braced tube which defines the perimeter of the office floor plates and creates stability under wind loads. The circulation and servicing core is located in a detached north-facing tower, containing passenger and goods lifts, service risers and on-floor plant and WCs.

Floor Plate Showing Public Realm
Floor Plate Showing Public Realm

The building’s envelope expresses the diversity of what it encloses, reinforcing the composition and providing legibility to the primary elements. Although the tower occupies the entire site, the scheme delivers an unprecedented allocation of public space – the lower levels are recessed on a raking diagonal to create a spectacular, sunlit seven-story-high space complete with shops, exhibition space, soft landscaping and trees.

Courtesy of The Leadenhall Building Development Company
Courtesy of The Leadenhall Building Development Company

The structure aims to reinforce the geometry defined by the development envelope, which in turn creates the distinctive tapering form, and takes the form of a perimeter braced ‘tube’ that defines the extent of the floor plates. The ladder frame contributes to the vertical emphasis of the building, and encloses the fire-fighting cores that serve the office floors. The frame also visually anchors the building to the ground.

Courtesy of The Leadenhall Building Development Company
Courtesy of The Leadenhall Building Development Company

This public space offers a half-acre extension to the adjacent piazza of St Helen’s Square. Overlooking the space is a public bar and restaurant served by glazed lifts. This new public space will provide a rare oasis within the dense urban character of the City of London.

Floor Plate Plans
Floor Plate Plans

The office floors take the form of simple rectangular floor plates which progressively diminish in depth by 750 millimetres towards the apex. Office floors are connected to the structural ‘tube’ at every floor level without the need for secondary vertical columns at the perimeter.

East Elevation
East Elevation

The building is designed to express all the constituent elements behind a single glazed envelope. Facades to the office areas require the highest comfort criteria in relation to heat loss, daylight, glare control and solar gain. Here, the facade is supplemented with an internal layer of double-glazing, forming a cavity which incorporates the structural frame. The external glazing incorporates vents at node levels to allow outside air to enter and discharge from the cavity. Controlled blinds in the cavity automatically adjust to limit unwanted solar gain and glare.

Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The lower levels of the building are recessed on a raking diagonal to create a large public space that opens up to the south. 

Construction should be completed in the summer of 2014.

Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Cite: Becky Quintal. "In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners" 21 Jun 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/392494/in-progress-the-leadenhall-building-rogers-stirk-harbour-partners/>
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2 Comments

Bubble · June 22, 2013

I like it, but I think it's more for nostalgic reasons than anything else. Big ol' trusses <3

Scott Smith · June 22, 2013

So many great projects going on in London right now, I'm jealous.

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