‘Mood Map’ Exhibit / E/B Office

Courtesy of E/B Office

Built and exhibited at “Data Curation” in the Museum of Art at National University, ‘Mood Map’ visualizes the moods of Korean people in color and light through textual analysis of their Tweets on Twitter. Designed by E/B Office, they created a custom software program in Processing that will search and analyze Tweets in Korean language through the Twitter API. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of E/B Office

Tweets will be analyzed using a text analysis library that searches for specific strings of Korean characters that describe certain moods or feelings. There are 6 main categories of feelings or moods we will search and visualize: joy/pride, love, fear/ shame, anger, pity, and sadness/frustration. Mood Map cycles through 3 visualization sequences.

Courtesy of E/B Office

The first sequence displays occurrences of tweets in real time. The second sequence is showing collective data of two moods in past one hour. And the third is collective data of one mood in a day. This sequence controls the intensity of color associated with each mood/feeling. The 6 mood/feeling categories will be associated with 6 fiber optic illuminators, each with a specific color.

Courtesy of E/B Office

Each illuminator will be paired to two other illuminators through the connection of fiber optic cables. So as the intensity of certain moods changes over time, visitors can witness the relative expression of all the moods compared to each other, changing dynamically over time every 30 seconds. The overall composition will express a flux of mood, feeling, intensity and time transmitted to a spatial 3D body.

Architects: E/B Office
Location: Seoul,
Design Team: Yong Ju Lee, Brian Brush
Assembly Team: KwangYeon Cho, Kibum Park, Young-Won Chi, Byunghwa Kim, Min Jae Lee, Sang Ki Nam, Daram Park, HyunWoo Yoo
Visualization: Noa Younse
Year: 2013

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "‘Mood Map’ Exhibit / E/B Office" 06 Jun 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 31 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=383546>