Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects

© Hwang Hyochel

Architects: JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects
Location: Jeollanam-do,
Area: 57 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Hwang Hyochel,

Construction: team of Ra kwonsu
Structure: HM
Interior: SM interior
Budget: 42,000,000 won

This house was the very first product of “Low Cost House Series”, a joint project with non-profit organization Childfund Korea to renovate houses of low-income people living in a very poor environment. It was for a family of six, parents and four children who had lost their house by fire last October in a village called Beolgyo situated in the southern part of South Korea.

© Hwang Hyochel

As we launched the project and started to rebuild this burnt house, we had to solve three major problems. The first problem was its inefficient plan. Although the original housewas about 49.5m2 in size, the actual space the family could use was very limited with an inefficient and restricted flow of movement. The second was that there was no insulation in the exterior walls as the house was very poorly built by an inexpert local builder a long time ago. The last problem was a light. As the building was facing north, and the shades of tall bamboo trees on its south were so thick, the light could not penetrate the house at all.

Section

The success or failure of the project depended on finding the most efficient, economical and practical solution. One of the keys we found was a roof. By using cheap air caps in the roof, an exceptional method in architecture, we have provided both light and insulation to the house. It was to overlap 25 sheets of air caps with three air layers each to create 75 insulated air layers in total. This air cap-insulated roof was to keep the whole house as light as possible by penetrating sunlight and insulate the space as well.

© Hwang Hyochel

Another solution was to create two adjoining rooms separated by a sliding door for four kids (two boys and two girls) who used to live together in one very tiny room. The door in the middle now gives privacy to both the boys and girls when kept closed and created ‘one’ space that they all could play and study together when wide open.

Cite: "Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects" 15 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 16 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=344479>

15 comments

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      your assumption is almost right and a bit wrong as well. the bubble wrap has only two air layers but the one we used and called “air caps”(actually it has many different names like “뽁뽁이” in Korean) has three air layers and it is a kind of stiffer and thicker. So they have different function and purpose, even though they look almost same.

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Your assumption is almost right and a bit wrong as well. the bubble wrap has only two air layers but the one we used and called “air caps”(actually it has many different names like “뽁뽁이” in Korean) has three air layers and it is a kind of stiffer and thicker. So they have different function and purpose, even though they look almost same.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Yes, what is an “air cap”?
    I think the building is very good, I am interested in low cost clever housing

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    His assumption is almost right and a bit wrong as well.
    The bubble wrap has only two air layers but the one we called ” air caps” has three air layers.
    And it is less softer and thicker.
    So they have different function and purposes, even though they look almost same.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    The bubble wrap transparent roofing insulaion is a nice idea, but the sunlight and the virtually unavoidable water condensation may causes algae problems i think…

  5. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    좋아요! 좋아요!
    어려운 가정이였는데..ㅎ
    초록우산 어린이재단과 재능기부하신 원유민소장님, 후원자님들께 다시 한번 감사드립니다.

    여러분~
    보성녹차밭으로 놀러오세요~

  6. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    저비용 건축에 관심이 많고 특히 노인 시설에 관심이 많습니다.
    잘 보았습니다.
    계속! !!
    다 잘 될 것입니다.
    응원하겠습니다.

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