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  7. Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects

Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects

  • 01:00 - 15 March, 2013
Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects
Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects, © Hwang Hyochel
© Hwang Hyochel

© Hwang Hyochel © Hwang Hyochel © Hwang Hyochel Courtesy of JYA-RCHITECTS +11

  • Construction

    team of Ra kwonsu
  • Structure

    HM
  • Interior

    SM interior
  • Budget

    42,000,000 won
  • More SpecsLess Specs

This house was the very first product of “Low Cost House Series”, a joint project with non-profit organization Childfund Korea to renovate houses of low-income people living in a very poor environment. It was for a family of six, parents and four children who had lost their house by fire last October in a village called Beolgyo situated in the southern part of South Korea.

© Hwang Hyochel
© Hwang Hyochel

As we launched the project and started to rebuild this burnt house, we had to solve three major problems. The first problem was its inefficient plan. Although the original housewas about 49.5m2 in size, the actual space the family could use was very limited with an inefficient and restricted flow of movement. The second was that there was no insulation in the exterior walls as the house was very poorly built by an inexpert local builder a long time ago. The last problem was a light. As the building was facing north, and the shades of tall bamboo trees on its south were so thick, the light could not penetrate the house at all.

Section
Section

The success or failure of the project depended on finding the most efficient, economical and practical solution. One of the keys we found was a roof. By using cheap air caps in the roof, an exceptional method in architecture, we have provided both light and insulation to the house. It was to overlap 25 sheets of air caps with three air layers each to create 75 insulated air layers in total. This air cap-insulated roof was to keep the whole house as light as possible by penetrating sunlight and insulate the space as well.

© Hwang Hyochel
© Hwang Hyochel

Another solution was to create two adjoining rooms separated by a sliding door for four kids (two boys and two girls) who used to live together in one very tiny room. The door in the middle now gives privacy to both the boys and girls when kept closed and created ‘one’ space that they all could play and study together when wide open.

Cite: "Low Cost House / JYA-RCHITECTS + Mue & Zijn Architects" 15 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/344479/low-cost-house-jya-rchitects-mue-zijn-architects/>
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11 Comments

Gami · May 23, 2014

Great Idea on the transparent roofing system. Love the zeal of the team to provide a beautiful and very functional home for this family. Question: Is there any concern with respect to Fire protection ? seems too much plastic and in thin layers, which seems as a potential fire risk ? Thanks

??? · July 04, 2013

??? ??? ??? ?? ?? ?? ??? ??? ????.
? ?????.
??! !!
? ? ? ????.
???????.

marton lucas · July 04, 2013 03:55 AM

Sorry english please

??? · March 20, 2013

???! ???!
??? ??????..?
???? ?????? ?????? ??????, ?????? ?? ?? ??????.

???~
??????? ?????~

Dar · March 19, 2013

its horible showing on pictures dog chained...

YouMin Won · March 18, 2013

it's so niceeeee!!!

Marton L. · March 17, 2013

The bubble wrap transparent roofing insulaion is a nice idea, but the sunlight and the virtually unavoidable water condensation may causes algae problems i think...

Chris · November 26, 2013 09:40 PM

I agree, It is beautiful. I hope that it weathers well. If so this is a great scalable solution!

JYA · March 17, 2013

His assumption is almost right and a bit wrong as well.
The bubble wrap has only two air layers but the one we called " air caps" has three air layers.
And it is less softer and thicker.
So they have different function and purposes, even though they look almost same.

Paul Gerhard · March 17, 2013

Yes, what is an "air cap"?
I think the building is very good, I am interested in low cost clever housing

jean · March 16, 2013

Wow it looks interesting!!

Y · March 16, 2013

Your assumption is almost right and a bit wrong as well. the bubble wrap has only two air layers but the one we used and called "air caps"(actually it has many different names like "???" in Korean) has three air layers and it is a kind of stiffer and thicker. So they have different function and purpose, even though they look almost same.

Randy Gaston · March 16, 2013

By "air caps" I presume they mean bubble wrap?

AN · March 18, 2013 05:15 AM

good

YouMin Won · March 16, 2013 12:09 PM

your assumption is almost right and a bit wrong as well. the bubble wrap has only two air layers but the one we used and called "air caps"(actually it has many different names like "???" in Korean) has three air layers and it is a kind of stiffer and thicker. So they have different function and purpose, even though they look almost same.

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